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History of Early American Landscape Design

Difference between revisions of "Seat"

[http://www.nga.gov/content/ngaweb/research/casva/research-projects.html A Project of the National Gallery of Art, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts ]
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In the discourse of landscape design, seat possessed two distinct yet equally prevalent meanings, as indicated by Thomas Sheridan’s 1789 dictionary entry. One sense referred to seat as a large estate, usually marked by a country house or mansion, for example, William Hamilton’s Woodlands, near Philadelphia; or Gen. Charles Ridgely’s Hampton, in Baltimore County, Md. A seat was also a garden structure for sitting.
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Revision as of 15:35, March 18, 2015

In the discourse of landscape design, seat possessed two distinct yet equally prevalent meanings, as indicated by Thomas Sheridan’s 1789 dictionary entry. One sense referred to seat as a large estate, usually marked by a country house or mansion, for example, William Hamilton’s Woodlands, near Philadelphia; or Gen. Charles Ridgely’s Hampton, in Baltimore County, Md. A seat was also a garden structure for sitting.

Retrieved from "https://heald.nga.gov/mediawiki/index.php?title=Seat&oldid=7564"

History of Early American Landscape Design contributors, "Seat," History of Early American Landscape Design, , https://heald.nga.gov/mediawiki/index.php?title=Seat&oldid=7564 (accessed October 18, 2021).

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