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History of Early American Landscape Design

Difference between revisions of "Talk:Porch"

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RA 7/9/15: See Veranda's Discussion page for problems in the second paragraph of the Porch page (as well as those for Portico and Piazza)
 
RA 7/9/15: See Veranda's Discussion page for problems in the second paragraph of the Porch page (as well as those for Portico and Piazza)
  
RA 7/9/15: I'm not sure that the Downing quotation about the rustic porch at __ really makes an argument about porches framing views/prospects. Here's the quotation:  
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RA 7/9/15: I'm not sure that the Downing quotation about the rustic porch at Montgomery Place makes an argument about porches "directing a view or prospect." Here's the quotation:
  
 
::"Not long after leaving the rustic pavilion, on descending by one of the paths that diverges to the left, we reach a charming little covered resting place, in the form of a rustic porch. The roof is prettily thatched with thick green moss. Nestling under a dark canopy of evergreens in the shelter of a rocky fern-covered bank, an hour or two may be whiled away within it, almost unconscious of the passage of time."
 
::"Not long after leaving the rustic pavilion, on descending by one of the paths that diverges to the left, we reach a charming little covered resting place, in the form of a rustic porch. The roof is prettily thatched with thick green moss. Nestling under a dark canopy of evergreens in the shelter of a rocky fern-covered bank, an hour or two may be whiled away within it, almost unconscious of the passage of time."

Revision as of 16:41, July 28, 2015

[KP 6/25/15] It is unclear to me if "Rustic Seat" (File: 0358) should be listed as an inscribed image for porch. The text accompanying the image describes many different architectural features, including a "a rustic seat, placed on a bold little plateau, at the base of a large tree, eighty feet above the water", a "little rustic pavilion, from which a much lower and wider view of the landscape is again enjoyed", and "a charming little covered resting place, in the form of a rustic proch" [sic].
[CT 7/2/15] "Porch" is actually spelled correctly in Horticulturist...it was just misspelled in FileMaker (fixed now). But I agree that it should be associated.


RA 7/9/15: See Veranda's Discussion page for problems in the second paragraph of the Porch page (as well as those for Portico and Piazza)

RA 7/9/15: I'm not sure that the Downing quotation about the rustic porch at Montgomery Place makes an argument about porches "directing a view or prospect." Here's the quotation:

"Not long after leaving the rustic pavilion, on descending by one of the paths that diverges to the left, we reach a charming little covered resting place, in the form of a rustic porch. The roof is prettily thatched with thick green moss. Nestling under a dark canopy of evergreens in the shelter of a rocky fern-covered bank, an hour or two may be whiled away within it, almost unconscious of the passage of time."

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History of Early American Landscape Design contributors, "Talk:Porch," History of Early American Landscape Design, , https://heald.nga.gov/mediawiki/index.php?title=Talk:Porch&oldid=12774 (accessed November 28, 2022).

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