*[[George Washington|Washington, George]], February 28, 1785, describing [[Mount Vernon]], plantation of George Washington, Fairfax County, VA (quoted in Johnson 1953: 99–100)<ref>Gerald W. Johnson, ''Mount Vernon: The Story of a Shrine'' (New York: Random House, 1953), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/F2JS5DHZ view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“My Gardens have gravel '''walks''' (as you possibly may recollect) in the usual Style, but if a better composition has been discovered for these, I should gladly adopt it. the matter however which I wish principally to be informed in, is, whether your '''walks''' are designed for Carriages, and if so, how they are prepared, to resist the impression of the Wheels. I am making a serpentine road to my door, and have doubts. . . whether any thing short of solid pavement will answer.”
*[[George Washington|Washington, George]], 1785, describing [[Mount Vernon]], plantation of George Washington, Fairfax County, VA (Jackson and Twohig, eds., 1978: 4:96, 97)<ref>Donald Jackson and Dorothy Twohig, ''The Diaries of George Washington'', 6 vols. (Charlottesville, VA: University Press of Virginia, 1978), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/9ZIIR3FT/ view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“[February 28] Planted all the Mulberry trees, Maple trees, & Black gums in my Serpentine '''walks''' and the Poplars on the right '''walk'''—the Sap of which and the Mulberry appeared to be moving. Also planted 4 trees from H. Hole the name unknown but of a brittle wood which has the smell of Mulberry. . .
<p></p>
*[[Hovey, C. M.]], November 1839, “Notices of Gardens and Horticulture, in Salem, Mass.,” describing Elfin Glen, residence of P. Dodge, Salem, MA (''Magazine of Horticulture'' 5: 404)<ref>C. M. Hovey, “Notices of Gardens and Horticulture, in Salem, Mass.,” ''The Magazine of Horticulture, Botany, and All Useful Discoveries and Improvements in Rural Affairs'' 5, no. 11 (November 1839): 401–16, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/25HW5NZ9/q/notices%20of%20gardens%20and%20horticulture view on Zotero].</ref>
:“The cottage stands near the road, and is entered from the west front; on the south end is a [[piazza]]; the drawing-room opens into this, and thence into the garden to an open space, answering somewhat the purpose of a [[terrace]], neatly gravelled; a '''walk''' from thence conducts directly, in a straight line, nearly to the edge of the river, where it terminates in a rustic [[arch]] and [[vase]] on the [[lawn]]; on each side of the '''walk''' there is turf, with circles of flowers at the distance of ten or twelve feet; these are each backed by a line of buckthorn [[hedge]]s, with a [[view]] to screen both the fruit garden on the east, and the vegetable garden on the west, from sight.”
*[[Hovey, C. M.]], September 1841, describing the residence of R. F. Carman, Fort Washington, NY (''Magazine of Horticulture'' 7: 326)<ref>C. M. Hovey, “Notes Made During a Visit to New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington and intermediate places, from August 8th to the 23rd, 1841,” ''The Magazine of Horticulture, Botany, and All Useful Discoveries and Improvements in Rural Affairs'' 7, no. 9 (September 1841): 321–27, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/R9KPSMKS/q/notes%20made view on Zotero].</ref>
:“The [[flower garden]] is laid out in angular shaped [[bed]]s of small size, occupying a [[square]] of about one hundred feet, with the '''walks''' edged with box. The only fault we have to find with the plan is the narrowness of the '''walks''', not being above two feet wide, and, consequently, not allowing two to '''walk''' abreast. The same error we saw committed at other places. It should be laid down as a rule, never to make the '''walks''' less than three feet wide, and if three and a half, it will be better.”
:“. . . the brick '''walks''', for use when the ground is soft or covered with snow, have been extended; other '''walks''' have been laid out through the different [[grove]]s, and covered with tan, and their extension, now in progress, will give us more than a mile in the men’s division, and nearly as much in that appropriated to the females. These '''walks''' have been so located as to embrace our finest and most diversified [[view]]s, to wind through the [[wood]]s and [[clump]]s of trees which are scattered through the enclosure; and among them, it is hoped, will soon be seen summer-houses, rustic [[seat]]s, and other objects of interest, to tempt the patients voluntarily to prolong their '''walks''', and to spend a greater portion of their time out of the wards, and engaged in some agreeable occupation.”
 
 
*Longfellow, Alexander W., January 1844, describing the Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow House, Cambridge, MA (quoted in Evans 1993: 38)<ref>Catherine Evans, ''Cultural Landscape Report for Longfellow National Historic Site, History and Existing Conditions'' (Boston: National Park Service, North Atlantic Region, 1993), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/9TI9GUQN view on Zotero].</ref>
 
:“We were very busy planning the grounds & I laid out a linden [[avenue]] for the Professor’s private '''walk'''. I was often reminded of your fancy for such things. . . The house is to be repaired but not essentially altered, the old out buildings to be removed, trees planted a [[pond]], & [[Rustic_style|rustic]] [[bridge]], created the [[pond]] is an apology for the [[bridge]].”
*Committee on the Capitol Square, Richmond City Council, July 24, 1851, describing [[John Notman|John Notman’s]] plans for the [[Capitol Square]], Richmond, VA (quoted in Greiff 1979: 162)<ref>Constance Greiff, ''John Notman, Architect, 1810–1865'' (Philadelphia: Athenaeum of Philadelphia, 1979), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/SXT2RI6Z view on Zotero].</ref>
:“'''walks''' will be made in every direction and as some compensation for filling up the beautiful vale south of the Monument a capacious fountain will be placed in the centre of the '''walk''' leading into Bank street, from which [[fountain]] a [[jet d’eau]] will rise, fully thirty feet in height.”
 
===Citations===
<p></p>
:“This is a good time to make grass '''walks'''. First level and roll the ground—then cut sods of equal size and thickness from a pasture, lay them neatly, and roll them well or sow grass seed very thick, and rake it in and roll the ground as soon as it is dry. Clean grass and gravel '''walks''': the latter may be dug, turning the top to the bottom, which will destroy the weeds and moss, roll them well afterwards. Weed all your flower [[border]]s well, and prepare more for next month.”
 
 
*Cobbett, William, 1819, ''The American Gardener'' (1819: 34) <ref>William Cobbett, ''The American Gardener'', 1st ed. (Claremont, NH: Manufacturing Company, 1819), 34, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/9CBPIU6H view on Zotero].</ref>
:'''''Walks''', Paths, [[Plot/Plat|Plats]], [[Border]]s, and a Hot-[[Bed]] Ground.''
:“58. To render my directions more clear as well as more brief, I have given a plan of my proposed garden, PLATE I . . .
:59. . . . Before, however, I proceed further, let me give my reasons for choosing an ''Oblong [[Square]]'', instead of a ''[[Square]] of equal sides''. It will be seen, that the length of my garden is from East to West. By leaving a greater length in this direction than from North to South three important advantages are secured. ''First'', we get a ''long'' and ''warm'' [[border]] under the ''North [[fence]]'' for the rearing of things early in the spring. ''Second'', we get a ''long'' and ''cool'' [[border]] under the ''South'' [[fence]] for ''shading'', during the great heats. . .
:“Plant slips in rows four inches apart, for [[edging]]. It does well for a [[walk]] side, or you may make a [[bed]] the same distance, the rows a foot apart. <p></p>
:“It [[kitchen garden|[a kitchen garden]]] may be either square or oblong, but is most convenient to work when the sides are straight, with a [[fence]] of moderate height. In laying out, I would prefer a [[border]] all round the width of the [[border]], the main cross [[walk]]s four feet wide, to plant currants, gooseberry, and raspberry bushes, four feet apart, or strawberry plants near the farmyard, and convenient for water. . .”
 
 
*[[Andrew Jackson Downing|Downing, Andrew Jackson]], 1844, Excerpt from ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening, Adapted to North America; . . . '' (1844: 102)<ref>A. J. Downing, ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening, Adapted to North America; with a View to the Improvement of Country Residences. . . with Remarks on Rural Architecture'', 2nd ed. (New York: Wiley and Putnam, 1844), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/IGJXRU9V view on Zotero].</ref>
 
:"In fig. 25, is shown a small piece of ground, on one side of a cottage, in which a [[picturesque]] character is attempted to be maintained. The [[plantation]]s here, are made mostly with shrubs instead of trees, the latter being only sparingly introduced, for the want of room. In the disposition of these shrubs, however, the same attention to [[picturesque]] effect is paid as we have already pointed out in our remarks on grouping ; and by connecting the [[thicket]]s and groups here and there, so as to conceal one '''walk''' from the other, a surprising variety and effect will frequently be produced, in an exceedingly limited spot."
:“'''WALKS'''. See ''Gravel''. It may be observed here, that of whatever material a '''walk''' is composed, that it is essential to have it well under-drained, and for this purpose an understratum of flints or brick-bats, twelve inches deep, is not too much. '''Walks''' so founded, are never wet or soft. Coal ashes, or which is still better, fresh tan, makes a pleasant winter '''walk''', particularly on tenacious soils, as it never adheres to the shoes, either during rain or after frost; half an inch I think is sufficient. It likewise makes a soft and pleasant summer '''walk''', and from its loose nature, is readily cleared from weeds. If not wanted during summer, it may readily be swept clean off after a few dry days. It is invaluable for covering '''walks''' or footpaths in the [[kitchen garden]], when there is much wheeling of manure or soil. . . —''Gard. Chron''.”
 
*[[Andrew Jackson Downing|Downing, Andrew Jackson]], April 1847, “Hints on Flower Gardens” (''Horticulturist'' 1: 444)<ref>Andrew Jackson Downing, “Hints on Flower Gardens,” ''Horticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste'' 1, no. 10 (April 1847): 441–45, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/IRG26IQH view on Zotero].</ref>
 
:". . . still another most delightful scene is reserved, a so-called Rococo garden. . . A garden, laid out in this manner, demands much cleverness and skill in the gardener. . . Around it the most charming landscape open to the [[view]], gently swelling hills, interspersed with pretty village, gardens and grounds. In the plan of the garden, ''a'' and ''b'' are massed of [[shrub]]s; ''c'', circular [[bed]]s, separated by a border or belt of turf, ''e'', from the serpentine [[bed]], ''d''. The whole of this running pattern is surrounded by a border of turf, ''f''; ''g'' and ''h'' are gravel '''walks'''; i, beds, with pedestal and [[statue]] in the centre; ''k'', small oval [[bed]]s, separated from the [[bed]], ''l'', by a border or turf; ''m, n, o, p'', irregular arabesque [[bed]], set in turf."
===Inscribed===
<gallery widths="170px" heights="170px" perrow="7">
 
Image:0481.jpg|William Burgis, ''Plan of Boston in New England'', 1728. "Rope '''Walks'''" indicated in the center, above "Fort Hill".
Image:0078.jpg|Anonymous, Plan for a garden, mid-18th century.
Image:0681.jpg|Anonymous, ''The Plan and Elevation of the Present and Intended Buildings of the Georgia Orphan House Academy'' (1768).
Image:0167.jpg|[[Thomas Jefferson]], General plan of the summit of [[Monticello]] Mountain, before May 1768. '''Walk''' is written at the top left on this plan.
Image:0588.jpg|Joseph F. W. Des Barres, ''A Plan of the Town of Newport in the Province of Rhode Island'' (1780) in ''The Atlantic Neptune, published for the use of the Royal Navy of Great Britain'' (London: 1780–81).
Image:0090.jpg|[[Thomas Jefferson]], Letter describing plans for a “Garden Olitory,” c. 1804.
Image:0091.jpg|[[Thomas Jefferson]], General ideas for the improvement of [[Monticello]] [detail], c. 1804. The description notes “Walks “'''Walks''' in this style wind-ing up the mountain.”
Image:0166.jpg|[[Thomas Jefferson]], Sketch of the garden and flower [[bed]]s at [[Monticello]], June 7, 1807.
Image:1037.jpg|William Cobbett, “Plan for a Garden,” in ''The American Gardener'' (1819). Image:1350.jpg|[[J. C. Loudon]], Plan of "[[walk|''Walks'']]s", in ''An Encyclopædia of Gardening'', 4th ed. (1826), 796, fig. 549.
Image:1351.jpg|[[J. C. Loudon]], Plan of [[French_style|French]] [[parterre]] of embroidery, in ''An Encyclopædia of Gardening'', 4th ed. (1826), 797, fig. 550.
Image:1352.jpg|[[J. C. Loudon]], Plan of The botanic [[Botanic_gardenFlower_garden|botanic flower garden]] with a circular gravel-'''walk''', in ''An Encyclopædia of Gardening'', 4th ed. (1826), 801, fig. 553.
Image:1372.jpg|[[J. C. Loudon]], Plan of a [[Ferme_ornée/Ornamental_farm|ferme ornée]] with wild and irregular [[hedge]]s, in ''An Encyclopædia of Gardening'', 4th ed. (1826), 1023, fig. 722.
Image:0935.jpg|Alexander Walsh, “Plan of a Garden,” in ''New England Farmer'' 19, no. 39 (March 31, 1841): 308. "A '''walk''' 5 ft. in width, A A, of a semi-elliptical form. . . '''walks''' of 4 ft. width C C C C. . ."
Image:0960.jpg|John J. Thomas, “Plan of a Garden,” in ''Cultivator'' 9, no. 1 (January 1842): 22, fig. 8. “From ''o'' to ''m'', the '''walk'''. . .”
image:1000.jpg|Anonymous, “View “[[View]] of the Vinery at [[Blithewood]],” in [[A. J. Downing]], ed., ''Horticulturist'' 1, no. 2 (August 1846): pl. opp. 58. Image:1503.jpg|Anonymous, "The Rococo Garden of Baron Hügel, near Vienna," Horticulturist, vol. 1, no. 10 (April 1847), pl. opp. p. 441. "''g'' and ''h'' are gravel '''walks'''."
Image:1050.jpg|Richard Dolben, “Plan for Flower Garden,” 1847.
Image:0995.jpg|Anonymous, “The Espalier '''Walk ''' in the Fruit Garden at Wodenethe,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ed., ''Horticulturist'' 1, no. 11 (May 1847): pl. opp. 489.
Image:0943.jpg|Anonymous, “Plan of a small [[Greenhouse|Green-House]]” and “Section of the Same,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ed., ''Horticulturist'' 3, no. 6 (December 1848): 259, figs. 32 and 33.
Image:0376.jpg|Anonymous, “Plan of the foregoing grounds as a Country [[Seat]], after ten years’ improvement,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'', 4th ed. (1849), 114, fig. 24. Image:0380.jpg|Anonymous, “The Ravine '''Walk''' at [[Blithewood]],” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'', 4th ed. (1849), pl. opp. 350, fig. 40.
Image:03800391.jpg|Anonymous, “The Ravine Walk at [[Blithewood]]Irregular Flower-garden,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'', 4th ed. (1849), pl428, fig. 76. opp. 350, fig. 40.and the '''walks''' ''e''.”
Imageimage:03910775.jpg|Anonymous[[Frances Palmer]], “The Irregular Flower-garden,” in Ground [[A. J. Downingplot]]of a cottage, in William H. Ranlett, ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape GardeningThe Architect'', 4th ed. (1849), 428vol. 1, figpl. 7623. “the flower-beds "Ground [[plot]] showing the location of the house, ''b'walks''', roads &c. in the [[Modern_style/Natural_style|natural style]] with [[hedge]] and [[shrub]] [[border]]s. "
Image:0777.jpg|[[Frances Palmer]], “Ground [[Plot]] of 4-1/4 Acres,” in William H. Ranlett, ''The Architect'' (1851), vol. 2, pl. 6. "O" marks "'''walks'''".
Image:0584.jpg|Lewis Miller, Title page, ''Sketchbook of Landscapes in the State of Virginia'' (1853).
Image:0333.jpg|G. & F. Bill (firm), ''Birds eye [[view ]] of [[Mount_Vernon|Mt. Vernon]] the home of Washington'', c. 1859. "13. Plank '''Walk''' to Landing", on lower left, leading to n.8 Tomb.
Image:1097.jpg|Thomas S. Sinclair, “Plan of the [[Pleasure_ground/Pleasure_garden|Pleasure Grounds]] and Farm of the [[Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane]] at Philadelphia,” in Thomas S. Kirkbride, ''American Journal of Insanity'' 4, no. 4 (April 1848): plate opp. 280.
Image:1387.jpg|Batty Langley, “Part of a [[Park]] Exhibiting their manner of Planting, after a more Grand manner than has been done before,” in ''New Principles of Gardening'' (1728), pl. XIII.
Image:0285.jpg|Nicholas Garrison, ''A [[View ]] of Bethlehem, one of the Brethren’s Principal Settlements, in Pennsylvania, North America'', 1757. Image:0134.jpg|Christian Remick, ''A Prospective [[View]] of part of the [[Common]]s'', c. 1768.
Image:01342258.jpg|Sydney L. Smith (engraver) from a watercolor drawing by Christian Remick, ''(c. 1768) . A Prospective [[View ]] of part of the [[Common]]s'''Commons''', c1902. 1768Boston Pictorial Archive, Boston Public Library.
Image:0074.jpg|[[Thomas Jefferson]], Plan showing the rectangular flower [[bed]]s and proposed [[temple]]s at the corners of the [[terrace]] walks at [[Monticello]], before August 4, 1772.
Image:0337.jpg|Edward Savage, ''The West Front of [[Mount Vernon]]'', c. 1787—92.
Image:0338.jpg|Anonymous, ''A [[View ]] of [[Mount Vernon]]'', c. 1790.
Image:0153.jpg|John Drayton, ''A [[View ]] of the Battery and Harbour of New York, and the Ambuscade Frigate'', 1794.
Image:0343.jpg|George Isham Parkyns, ''[[Mount Vernon]]'', 1795.
Image:0073.jpg|[[Thomas Jefferson]], Plan of serpentine [[walk]] and flower [[bed]]s at [[Monticello]], May 23, 1808.
Image:07120044.jpg|Jean Hyacinthe de Laclotte[[Charles Willson Peale]], ''Battle [[View]] of New Orleansthe garden at [[Belfield]]'', 18151816.
Image:00441037.jpg|[[Charles Willson Peale]]William Cobbett, “Plan for a Garden,” in ''[[View]] of the garden at [[Belfield]]The American Gardener'', 1816(1819).
Image:0169.jpg|[[Thomas Jefferson]], Bird’s-eye [[view ]] of the University of Virginia, c. 1820.
Image:0716.jpg|Alvan Fisher, ''The Vale'', 1820—25.
Image:0486.jpg|James Smillie, “Bay & Harbour of New York, From the Battery,” in ''Bourne Views of New York'' (1831), plate 8.
 
Image:0665.jpg|Anonymous, Bonaparte’s residence and the surrounding park, c. 1830, in Alice B. Lockwood, ''Gardens of Colony and State'' (1931–34), 321.
 
Image:1025.jpg|Anonymous, “Entrance to [[Mount_Auburn_Cemetery|Mount Auburn]],” in ''American Magazine of Useful and Entertaining Knowledge'' 1, no. 1 (September 1834): 9.
Image:1106.jpg|Anonymous, “Massachusetts Hospital for the Insane, at Worcester,” in ''American Magazine of Useful anA Entertaining Knowledge'' 1, no. 8 (April 1835): 325.
image:1705.jpg|[[J. C. Loudon]], [[Kitchen garden]], in ''An Encyclopædia of Gardening'' (1834), 721, fig. 696.“. . .on the north, at the surrounding '''walk''' (c). . .”
Image:1298.jpg|Nicolino Calyo, ''[[View ]] of the Waterworks at Fairmount'', 1835–36.
Image:2256.jpg|John Henry Bufford. ''Fairmount from the first Landing'', cover illustration for sheet music for ''The Fairmount Quadrilles'', 1836, lithographs. Courtesy of the Free Library of Philadelphia, Print and Picture Department.
Image:1239.jpg|George Washington Sully, ''[[View ]] of the New Orleans River Front from Canal Street to the Place d’Armes'', 1836.
Image:0479.jpg|Fitz Hugh Lane after Charles Hubbard, ''The National Lancers with the Reviewing Officers on [[Boston Common]]'', 1837.
Image:0541.jpg|John T. Bowen, ''A [[View ]] of the Fairmount Water-Works with [[Schuylkill_River|Schuylkill]] in the distance, taken from the [[Mount]]'', 1838.
Image:1032.jpg|Anonymous, “Consecration Dell,” in ''The [[Picturesque]] Pocket Companion, and Visitor’s Guide, through [[Mount_Auburn_Cemetery|Mount Auburn]]'' (1839), 161.
Image:0034.jpg|[[Robert Mills]], Alternative plan for the grounds of the National Institution, 1841.
Image:19661047.jpg|Edward William MumfordAlexander W. Longfellow, ''Clarke’s Hall & Dock Creek''Sketch of the grounds of the Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow House, c1844 (recto). Walks are both the straight and winding paths across the property. Image:1047b.jpg|Alexander W. Longfellow, Sketch of the grounds of the Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow House, 1844(verso).
Image:10471861.jpg|Alexander WAnonymous, ''Grounds of a cottage orneé'', in A. J. LongfellowDowning, Sketch of ''A Treatise on the grounds Theory and Practice of the Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow HouseLandscape Gardening, '' (1844): 102, fig. 25.
Image:1049.jpg|N. Vautin, [[View ]] of North Side (Rear) of Longfellow House, June 1845.
Image:1150.jpg|Joseph C. Wells, attr., ''Roseland Cottage,'' c. 1846. The walk is to the right of the cottage.
Image:0357.jpg|[[Alexander Jackson Davis]], “[[Montgomery Place]],” in [[A. J. Downing]], ed., ''Horticulturist'' 2, no. 4 (October 1847): pl. opp. 153.
Image:0358.jpg|Anonymous, “Rustic “[[Rustic_style|Rustic]] [[Seat]],” [[Montgomery Place]], in [[A. J. Downing]], ed., ''Horticulturist'' 2, no. 4 (October 1847): 157, fig. 26.
Image:0394.jpg|Anonymous, “The [[Conservatory]],” [[Montgomery Place]], in [[A. J. Downing]], ed., ''Horticulturist'' 2, no. 4 (October 1847): 159, fig. 28.
Image:1007.jpg|Anonymous, “A [[Rustic_style|Rustic]] [[Alcove]],” in [[A. J. Downing]], ed. ''Horticulturist'' 2, no. 8 (February 1848): pl. opp. 345, fig. 4.
Image:0996.jpg|Anonymous, “A Small Arabesque [[Flower_garden|Flower Garden]],” in [[A. J. Downing]], ed., ''Horticulturist'' 2, no. 11 (May 1848): 504.
Image:0997.jpg|Anonymous, “Design for a [[Geometric_style|Geometric]] Flower Garden,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ed., ''Horticulturist'' 2, no. 12 (June 1848): 558, fig. 67.
Image:0766.jpg|Anonymous, “The Battery, New York, By Moonlight,” in ''Illustrated London News'' (October 27, 1849): 277.
Image:0428.jpg|Edward Weber, ''[[View ]] of Washington City and Georgetown'' [detail], 1849.
Image:0350.jpg|[[Alexander Jackson Davis]], “View “[[View]] in the Grounds at [[Blithewood]],” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'', 4th ed. (1849), frontispiece.
Image:0355.jpg|Anonymous, “View “[[View]] in the Grounds at [[Hyde Park]],” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'', 4th ed. (1849), pl. opp. 45, fig. 1.
Image:0361.jpg|Anonymous, “Beaverwyck, the [[Seat ]] of Wm. P. Van Rensselaer, Esq.,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'', 4th ed. (1849), pl. opp. 51, fig. 7.
Image:0366.jpg|Anonymous, “View “[[View]] in the Grounds at Pine Bank,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'' , 4th ed. (1849; repr., 1991), pl. opp. 57.
Image:0367.jpg|Anonymous, “View “[[View]] in the Grounds of James Arnold, Esq.” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'', 4th ed. (1849), pl. opp. 57.
Image:0370.jpg|Anonymous, “The [[Geometric style]], from an old print,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'', 4th ed. (1849), 62, fig. 14.
Image:0774.jpg|[[Frances Palmer]], Ground [[plot]]s for proposed houses near Clifton, Staten Island, in William H. Ranlett, ''The Architect'' (1849), vol. 1, pl. 18.
 
image:0775.jpg|[[Frances Palmer]], Ground [[plot]] of a cottage, in William H. Ranlett, ''The Architect'' (1849), vol. 1, pl. 23.
Image:0776.jpg|[[Frances Palmer]], “A [[plot]] of village property 724 feet by 488,” in William H. Ranlett, ''The Architect'' (1849), vol. 1, pl. 48.
Image:0942.jpg|Anonymous, “Plan of a Suburban Garden,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ed., ''Horticulturist'' 3, no. 8 (February 1849): pl. opp. 353.
Image:0612.jpg|John Bachmann, ''Bird’s Eye [[View ]] of Boston'', c. 1850.
Image:0492.jpg|Anonymous, ''Saratoga Schottisch'', New York, 1851.
Image:1038.jpg|Frederick Graff, ''Plan of [[Lemon_Hill|Lemon Hill]] and Sedgley Park, Fairmount and Adjoining Property'', October 15, 1851.
Image:0862.jpg|Edward Sachse, ''[[View]] of Washington'', 1852.
Image:0201.jpg|Anonymous, ''Perry Hall, Home of Harry Dorsey Gough'', n.d.
Image:0266.jpg|John Durrand, ''Thomas Atkinson'', n.d., a '''walk ''' is visible in the background on the right hand side leading to the buildings.
Image:0703.jpg|Lewis Miller, “The Yellow Sulphur Springs, Montgomery County,” n.d.
Image:1192.jpg|Anonymous, Garden plan, 18th century.
Image:0463.jpg|Anonymous, Overmantle Overmantel painting from Morattico Hall, 1715.
Image:0171.jpg|Anonymous, “Issac “Isaac Norris: his house at Fairhill,” 1717(1890).
Image:1377.jpg|Batty Langley, Garden with a [[canal]], in ''New Principles of Gardening'' (1728), pl. IV.
Image:0017.jpg|Anonymous, Illustration of Williamsburg buildings, flora and fauna. Modern impression taken from the original 1740s copperplate [Bodleian Plate re-strike].
Image:0290.jpg|William Burgis, ''[A [[prospect ]] of the colleges in Cambridge in New England.]'', 1743.
Image:0003.jpg|William Dering, attr., ''Portrait of George Booth'', 1748—50.
Image:0160.jpg|William Tennant, ''A North-West [[Prospect ]] of Nassau Hall, with a Front View of the Presidents House in New-Jersey'', Princeton College, 1764. Image:0255.jpg|John Singleton Copley, ''Rebecca Boylston'', 1767.
Image:0248.jpg|Claude Joseph Sauthier, ''A Plan of the Town of Newbern in Craven County, North Carolina'', 1769.
Image:00652262.jpg|Anonymous, ''1774 the The South West [[Prospect ]] of the [[Seat ]] of Colonel George Boyd of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, New England, 1774'', 1774.
Image:0256.jpg|The Beardsley Limner, ''Mrs. Hezekiah Beardsley (Elizabeth Davis)'', c. 1788—90.
Image:0058.jpg|[[Benjamin Henry Latrobe]], Garden plan with outbuildings, from “Buildings Erected or Proposed to be Built in Virginia,” 1795—99.
Image:2250_detail1.jpg|Unknown, [[Kitchen_garden|Kitchen Garden ]] [detail], Elias Hasket Derby House, [circa 1795-1799], Samuel McIntire Papers, MSS 264, flat file, plan 107. Courtesy of Phillips Library, Peabody Essex Museum, Rowley, MA.
Image:2250_detail2.jpg|Unknown, Kitchen Garden [detail], Elias Hasket Derby House, [circa 1795-1799], Samuel McIntire Papers, MSS 264, flat file, plan 107. Courtesy of Phillips Library, Peabody Essex Museum, Rowley, MA.
Image:0005.jpg|Amy Cox, attr., ''Box [[Grove]]'', c. 1800.
Image:0226.jpg|[[Charles Fraser]], ''Wigton on Saint James, Goose Creek: The [[Seat ]] of James Fraser, Esq.'', c. 1800.
Image:0732.jpg|William Russell Birch, ''Springland'', c. 1800.
Image:0296.jpg|Anonymous, ''Townscape, Stonington, Connecticut'', 1800—25.
Image:0155.jpg|John L. Boqueta de Woiseri, ''A [[View ]] of New Orleans taken from the [[plantation]] of Marigny'', November 1803.
Image:0207.jpg|Francis Guy, ''Mt. Deposit'', 1803—05.
Image:0731.jpg|William Russell Birch, ''[[View]] from Springland'', c. 1808.
FileImage:0322.jpg|William Russell Birch, “China Retreat Pennsyl.<sup>a</sup> the [[Seat ]] of M.<sup>r</sup> Manigault,” 1808, in William Russell Birch and Emily Cooperman, ''The Country Seats of the United States'' (2009), 79, pl. 19.
Image:0326.jpg|William Russell Birch, “The [[View]] from Springland,” in ''The Country Seats [[Seat]]s of the United States of North America: With Some Scenes Connected with Them'' (1808), pl. 2.
Image:1679.jpg|[[Anne-Marguerite-Henriette Rouillé de Marigny Hyde de Neuville]], ''The Moreau House'', July 2, 1809.
Image:0150.jpg|Rebecca Chester, ''A Full [[View]] of Deadrick’s Hill'', 1810.
Image:0049.jpg|William Satchwell Leney after Hugh Reinagle, “View “[[View]] of the [[Botanic Garden]] of the State of New York,” in [[David Hosack]], ''Hortus Elginensis'' (1811), frontispiece.
Image:0050.jpg|Hugh Reinagle, ''Elgin Garden on Fifth Avenue'', c. 1812.
Image:0063.jpg|[[Benjamin Henry Latrobe]], “Plan of the public [[Square]] in the city of New Orleans, as proposed to be improved. . .” [detail], March 20, 1819.
Image:0416.jpg|Joseph Jacques Ramée (artist), J. Klein and V. Balch (engravers), “View “[[View]] of Union College in the City of Schenectady,” c. 1820.
Image:0719.jpg|Eliza Susan Quincy, “Seat “[[Seat]] of Josiah Quincy, Esqr.,” 1822.
Image:0521.jpg|William Rush, ''North East or Franklin Public [[Square]], Philadelphia'', 1824.
Image:1427.jpg|William Guy Wall, ''City Hall'', 1826.
Image:0675.jpg|Anthony Imbert after [[Alexander Jackson Davis]], ''[[View ]] of the Battery and Castle Garden'', 1826—28.
FileImage:1280.jpg|John Rubens Smith, ''[East front of the United States Capitol]'', c. 1828.
Image:1281.jpg|John Rubens Smith, West Front of the Capitol, c. 1828.
Image:1279.jpg|John Rubens Smith, West front of the United States Capitol with cows in the foreground, c. 1831.
Image:1432.jpg|Milo Osborne, “Deaf and Dumb Asylum,” in Theodore S. Fay, ''Views [[View]]s in New-York and its Environs from Accurate, Characteristic, and Picturesque Drawings'' (1831). Image:0490.jpg|Archibald L. Dick, “Elysian Fields, Hoboken (New York in the distance),” in ''[[View]]s in New-York and its Environs'' (1831—34).
Image:04901433.jpg|Archibald LJames H. DickDakin, “Elysian Fields“La Grange [[Terrace]], Hoboken (La Fayette Place, City of New York in the distance),” in ''Views in New-York and its Environs'' (1831—34).
Image:14331025.jpg|James H. DakinAnonymous, “La Grange Terrace“Entrance to [[Mount_Auburn_Cemetery|Mount Auburn]], La Fayette Place, City ” in ''American Magazine of New YorkUseful and Entertaining Knowledge'' 1,” 1831—34no. 1 (September 1834): 9.
Image:0651.jpg|John Warner Barber, “Southeastern [[view ]] of Wesleyan University, Middletown,” in ''Connecticut Historical Collections'' (1836), 510.
Image:0424.jpg|[[Alexander Jackson Davis]], Ithiel Town, and James Dakin, ''New York University, Washington Square'', 1833.
Image:0489.jpg|John William Hill (artist), William James Bennett (engraver), ''New York, from Brooklyn Heights'', 1837.
Image:1142.jpg|John Caspar Wild, ''Laurel Hill [[Cemetery/Burying ground/Burial ground|Cemetery]], Philadelphia'', 1838.
Image:1283.jpg|William A. Pratt (artist), Charles Fenderich (lithographer), “Elevation of the eastern front of the Capitol of the United States,” c. 1839.
Image:0727.jpg|Thomas Cole, ''Gardens of the Van Rensselaer Manor House'', 1840.
Image:10220524.jpg|Charles Alexandre LesueurAnonymous, “Residence of Thomas SayPalladian Villa Style Building in Formal Landscape, Esqrc. (Naturalist) at New Harmony, Indiana,” 18401840—50.
Image:05240032.jpg|Anonymous[[Robert Mills]], Palladian Villa Style ''[[Picturesque]] [[View]] of the Building , and Grounds in Formal Landscapefront'', c. 1840—501841.
Image:00320955.jpg|[[Robert MillsAlexander Jackson Davis]], ''[[PicturesqueView]] N. W. at [[Blithewood]] View of the Building, and Grounds in front'', c. 1841.
Image:0823.jpg|Joshua Barney, ''Map of Hampton'', 1843. Courtesy: Hampton National Historic Site, National Park Service.
Image:1048.jpg|Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Sketch of the Grounds of the Longfellow Estate, 1844.
 
Image:1966.jpg|Edward William Mumford, ''Clarke’s Hall & Dock Creek'', c. 1844.
Image:1102.jpg|F. F. Judd (artist), E. B. and E. C. Kellogg (lithographers), “Retreat for the Insane, Hartford, Connecticut,” in ''Twenty-Second Annual Report of the Officers of the Retreat for the Insane at Hartford, Connecticut'' (1846), 314.
Image:0110.jpg|Joseph Goldsborough Bruff (artist), Edward Weber & Co. (lithographer), ''Elements of National Thrift and Empire'', c. 1847.
Image:0476.jpg|James Smillie (artist), Sarony & Major (printers), ''[[View ]] of Union [[Park]], New York, from the head of Broadway'', 1849.
Image:0959.jpg|Anonymous, “The [[Shrubbery]] and [[Flower_garden|Flower Garden]],” in ''Cultivator'' 5, no. 4 (April 1848): 114.
Image:0847.jpg|[[Alexander Jackson Davis]], Three figures going up a hill to a gazebo at [[Blithewood]], n.d. (c. 1849).
Image:0353.jpg|Anonymous, “Example of the beautiful in Landscape Gardening,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'', 4th ed. (1849), opp. 273, fig. 15.
Image:1139.jpg|Edwin Whitefield, ''[[View ]] of Hartford, CT. From the Deaf and Dumb Asylum'', 1849.
Image:0025.jpg|Robert P. Smith, ''[[View]] of Washington'', c. 1850.
Image:1232.jpg|Orsamus Turner, Life Cycle of a Pioneer Woodsman (“Third Sketch of the Pioneer”), in ''Pioneer History of the Holland Purchase'' (1850), opp. 565.
Image:1039.jpg|Anonymous, The [[Flower_garden|Flower-Garden]], in Joseph Breck, ''The [[Flower_garden|Flower-Garden]]: or, Breck’s Book of Flowers'' (1841), frontispiece.
Image:1967.jpg|[[A. J. Downing]], ''Plan Showing Proposed Method of Laying Out the [[Public_garden/Public_ground|Public Grounds]] at Washington'', 1851.
Image:1673.jpg|Anonymous, The Claremont, c. 1855.
 
Image:0023.jpg|[[A. J. Downing]], ''Plan Showing Proposed Method of Laying Out the [[Public_garden/Public_ground|Public Grounds]] at Washington'', 1851.
Image:1009.jpg|Anonymous, ''Homestead of Humphrey H. Nye, New Bedford'', 1860—65.
Image:00231022.jpg|[[ADavid J. JKennedy, after Charles Alexandre Lesueur (c. Downing]]1830), ''Plan Showing Proposed Method Residence of Laying Out the [[Public_garden/Public_ground|Public Grounds]] Thomas Say, Esqr. (Naturalist) at WashingtonNew Harmony, Indiana'', 1851.1870
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Changes - History of Early American Landscape Design
HEALD will be upgrading in spring 2021. New features and content will be available this summer. Thank you for your patience!

Changes


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