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History of Early American Landscape Design

Seat

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History

In the discourse of landscape design, seat possessed two distinct yet equally prevalent meanings, as indicated by Thomas Sheridan’s 1789 dictionary entry. One sense referred to seat as a large estate, usually marked by a country house or mansion, for example, William Hamilton’s Woodlands, near Philadelphia; or Gen. Charles Ridgely’s Hampton, in Baltimore County, Md. A seat was also a garden structure for sitting.


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Retrieved from "https://heald.nga.gov/mediawiki/index.php?title=Seat&oldid=7566"

History of Early American Landscape Design contributors, "Seat," History of Early American Landscape Design, , https://heald.nga.gov/mediawiki/index.php?title=Seat&oldid=7566 (accessed September 22, 2021).

A Project of the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts

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