A Project of the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art
History of Early American Landscape Design

Difference between revisions of "Lemon Hill"

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Image:0043.jpg|John Archibald Sr. ''Lemon Hill'' (1807); Courtesy of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania Collection, Atwater Kent Museum of Philadelphia"
 
Image:0043.jpg|John Archibald Sr. ''Lemon Hill'' (1807); Courtesy of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania Collection, Atwater Kent Museum of Philadelphia"
 
Image:1038.jpg|Frederick Graff, "Plan of Lemon Hill and Sedgley Park, Fairmount and Adjoining Property" (October 15, 1851); Fairmount Park; Library Company of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
 
Image:1038.jpg|Frederick Graff, "Plan of Lemon Hill and Sedgley Park, Fairmount and Adjoining Property" (October 15, 1851); Fairmount Park; Library Company of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Image:1138.jpg|William Groombridge, ''View of Lemon Hill'' (c. 1800); Schwarz Gallery, Philadelphia, PA; [[painting]]
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Image:1803.jpg|B.R. Evans, ''Lemon Hill'' (1852); Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
 
 
  
 
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Revision as of 19:21, April 12, 2012

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemon_Hill

Site dates:

Site Owner(s):
Robert Morris (dates)
Henry Pratt (dates)

Site designer(s):

Alternate Names: The Hills

Associated Sites: Belmont (Pennsylvannia), Clermont, Fairmont

Location:
Philadelphia, PA
View on Google maps


Images

Bibliography

  • Downing, A. J. [Andrew Jackson]. 1849. A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening... 4th ed. New York: G. P. Putnam.[1]
Lemon Hill, half a mile above the Fairmount water-works of Philadelphia, was, 20 years ago, the most perfect specimen of the geometric mode in America, and since its destruction by the extension of the city, a few years since, there is nothing comparable with it, in that style, among us. All the symmetry, uniformity, and high art of the old school, were displayed here in artificial plantations, formal gardens with trellises, grottoes, spring-houses, temples, statues, and vases, with numerous ponds of water, jets-d’eau, and other water-works, parterres and an extensive range of hothouses.

Notes

  1. Downing, A. J. [Andrew Jackson]. A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening, Adapted to North America;... 4th ed. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, 1849.

Retrieved from "https://heald.nga.gov/mediawiki/index.php?title=Lemon_Hill&oldid=126"

History of Early American Landscape Design contributors, "Lemon Hill," History of Early American Landscape Design, , https://heald.nga.gov/mediawiki/index.php?title=Lemon_Hill&oldid=126 (accessed September 27, 2022).

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