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History of Early American Landscape Design

Difference between revisions of "John Bartram"

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*December 3, 1762, describing Charleston, S.C. (quoted in Darlington 1849: 242–43) <ref name="Darlington_1849"></ref>
 
*December 3, 1762, describing Charleston, S.C. (quoted in Darlington 1849: 242–43) <ref name="Darlington_1849"></ref>
 
:“I can’t find, in our country, that south [[wall]]s are much protection against our cold, for if we cover so close as to keep out the frost, they are suffocated.”
 
:“I can’t find, in our country, that south [[wall]]s are much protection against our cold, for if we cover so close as to keep out the frost, they are suffocated.”
 
 
* Wilson, Alexander, August 10, 1804, "A Rural Walk. The Scenery drawn from Nature," Gray's Ferry <ref> , 359-65
 
: “The Summer sun was riding high,
 
:: “The [[wood]] in deepest verdure drest;
 
: “From care and clouds of dust to fly,
 
:: “Across yon bubbling brook I past;
 
<p></p>
 
: “And up the hill, with cedars spread,
 
:: “Where vines through spice-[[wood]] [[thicket]]s roam;
 
: “I took the woodland path, that led
 
: “To [[John Bartram|Bartram’s]] hospitable dome….
 
<p> </p>
 
: “The squirrel chipp’d, the tree-frot whirr’d,
 
:: “The dove bemoan’d in shadiest [[bower|bow’r]]….
 
<p> </p>
 
: “A wide extended waste of [[wood]],
 
:: “Beyond in distant [[prospect]] lay;
 
: “Where Delaware’s majestic flood
 
:: “Shone like the radiant orb of day….
 
<p> </p>
 
: “There market-maids, in lovely rows,
 
:: “With wallets white, were riding home;
 
: “And thund’ring gigs, with powder’d beauxs [‘’sic’’],
 
:: “Through [[Gray’s Garden|Gray’s]] green festive shade to roam.
 
<p> </p>
 
: “There Bacchus fills his flowing cup,
 
:: “There Venus’ lovely train are seen;
 
: “There lovers sigh, and gluttons sup,
 
:: “By [[shrubbery|shrubb’ry]] [[walks]], in [[arbor|arbours]] green.
 
<p> </p>
 
: “But dearer pleasures warm my heart,
 
:: “And fairer scenes salute my eye;
 
: “As thro’ these cherry-rows I dart
 
:: “Where [[John Bartram|Bartram’s]] fairy landscapes lie.
 
<p> </p>
 
: “Sweet flows the [[Schuylkill River|Schuylkill’s]] winding tide,
 
:: “By [[John Bartram|Bartram’s]] emblossomed [[bower|bow’rs]];
 
: “Where nature sports, in all her pride
 
:: “Of choicest plants, and fruits, and flow’rs.
 
  
  

Revision as of 19:09, March 26, 2015

Texts

  • July 18, 1739, describing Westover, seat of William Byrd II, on the James River, Va. (1992: 121) [1]
“Col Byrd is very prodigal in Gates roads walks hedges & seeders [cedars] trimed finely & A little green house with 2 or 3 [orange] trees . . .”


“Dear friend, I am going to build a greenhouse. Stone is got; and hope as soon as harvest is over to begin to build it, to put some pretty flowering winter shrubs, and plants for winter’s diversion; not to be crowded with orange trees, or those natural to the Torrid Zone, but such as will do, being protected from frost.”


  • December 3, 1762, describing Charleston, S.C. (quoted in Darlington 1849: 242–43) [2]
“I can’t find, in our country, that south walls are much protection against our cold, for if we cover so close as to keep out the frost, they are suffocated.”


“He [John Bartram] was, perhaps, the first Anglo-American who conceived the idea of establishing a BOTANIC GARDEN for the reception and cultivation of the various vegetables, natives of the country, as well as exotics, and of travelling for the discovery and acquisition of them.*
“* The BARTRAM BOTANIC GARDEN, (established in or about the year 1730,) is most eligibly and beautifully situated, on the right bank of the river Schuylkill, a short distance below the city of Philadelphia. Being the oldest establishment of the kind in this western world, and exceedingly interesting, from its history and associations,—one might almost hope, even in this utilitarian age, that, if no motive more commendable could avail, a feeling of state or city pride, would be sufficient to ensure its preservation, in its original character, and for the sake of its original objects. But, alas! there seems to be too much reason to apprehend that it will scarcely survive the immediate family of its noble-hearted founder,—and that even the present generation may live to see the accumulated treasures of a century laid waste—with all the once gay parterres and lovely borders converted into lumberyards and coal-landings.”

Images

References

Notes

  1. John Bartram, The Correspondence of John Bartram, 1734-1777, ed. by Edmund Berkeley and Dorothy Smith Berkeley (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1992), view on Zotero.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 William Darlington, Memorials of John Bartram and Humphry Marshall: With Notices of Their Botanical Contemporaries (Philadelphia: Lindsay & Blakiston, 1849), view on Zotero.

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History of Early American Landscape Design contributors, "John Bartram," History of Early American Landscape Design, , https://heald.nga.gov/mediawiki/index.php?title=John_Bartram&oldid=8075 (accessed October 4, 2022).

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