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Difference between revisions of "John Bartram"

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* September 25, 1748, [[Pehr Kalm]], ''Travels into North America'' (1770, 1: 112-13) <ref> Peter [Pehr] Kalm, ''Travels into North America: Containing Its Natural History, and a Circumstantial Account of Its Plantations and Agriculture in General, with the Civil, Ecclesiastical and Commercial State of the Country, the Manners of the Inhabitants, and Several Curious and Important Remarks on Various Subjects'', trans. John Reinhold Forster, 3 vols. (London: John Reinhold Forster, 1770), 1, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/W7RZN46S view on Zotero]. </ref>
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* September 25, 1748, [[Pehr Kalm]], ''Travels into North America'' (1770, 1: 112-13) <ref> [[Pehr Kalm|Kalm, Peter [Pehr]]], ''Travels into North America: Containing Its Natural History, and a Circumstantial Account of Its Plantations and Agriculture in General, with the Civil, Ecclesiastical and Commercial State of the Country, the Manners of the Inhabitants, and Several Curious and Important Remarks on Various Subjects'', trans. John Reinhold Forster, 3 vols. (London: John Reinhold Forster, 1770), 1, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/W7RZN46S view on Zotero]. </ref>
 
: "Mr. ''John Bartram'' is an ''Englishman'', who lives in the country about four miles from ''Philadelphia''. He has acquired a great knowledge of natural philosophy and history, and seems to be born with a peculiar genius for these sciences.... He has in several successive years made frequent excursions into different distant parts of ''North America'', with an intention of gathering all sorts of plants which are scarce and little known. Those which he found he has planted in his own [[botanic garden|botanical garden]], and likewise sent over their seeds or fresh roots to ''England''. We owe to him the knowledge of many scarce plants, which he first found, and which were never known before."
 
: "Mr. ''John Bartram'' is an ''Englishman'', who lives in the country about four miles from ''Philadelphia''. He has acquired a great knowledge of natural philosophy and history, and seems to be born with a peculiar genius for these sciences.... He has in several successive years made frequent excursions into different distant parts of ''North America'', with an intention of gathering all sorts of plants which are scarce and little known. Those which he found he has planted in his own [[botanic garden|botanical garden]], and likewise sent over their seeds or fresh roots to ''England''. We owe to him the knowledge of many scarce plants, which he first found, and which were never known before."
  
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* November 4, 1754, [[Alexander Garden|Garden, Alexander]] to Cadwallader Colden (quoted in Fry, 2004: 32) <ref> Fry, 2004, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/R9R5T6QS view on Zotero]. </ref>
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: "I have met with very Little new in the Botanic way unless Your acquaintance Bartram, who is what he is & whose acquaintance alone makes amends for other dissapointments [''sic''] in that way.... His garden is a perfect portraiture of himself, here you meet wt. a row of rare plants almost covered over wt. weeds, here with a Beautiful Shrub, even Luxuriant Amongst Briars, and in another corner an Elegant & Lofty tree lost in common [[thicket]] &mdash; on our way from town to his house he carried me to severall rocks & Dens where he shewed me some of his rare plants, which he had brought from the Mountains &c. In a word he disdains to have a garden less than Pensylvania [''sic''] & Every den is an [[Arbor|Arbour]], Every run of water, a [[Canal]], & every small level Sport a [[Parterre]], where he nurses up some of his Idol Flowers & cultivates his darling production."
  
 
*June 24, 1760, in a letter to Peter Collinson, describing his plans for the [[Bartram Botanic Garden and Nursery]], vicinity of Philadelphia, Pa. (quoted in Darlington 1849: 224) <ref name="Darlington_1849">William Darlington, ''Memorials of John Bartram and Humphry Marshall: With Notices of Their Botanical Contemporaries'' (Philadelphia: Lindsay & Blakiston, 1849), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/TKNVQG76 view on Zotero].</ref>
 
*June 24, 1760, in a letter to Peter Collinson, describing his plans for the [[Bartram Botanic Garden and Nursery]], vicinity of Philadelphia, Pa. (quoted in Darlington 1849: 224) <ref name="Darlington_1849">William Darlington, ''Memorials of John Bartram and Humphry Marshall: With Notices of Their Botanical Contemporaries'' (Philadelphia: Lindsay & Blakiston, 1849), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/TKNVQG76 view on Zotero].</ref>

Revision as of 20:20, April 2, 2015

Texts

  • July 18, 1739, describing Westover, seat of William Byrd II, on the James River, Va. (1992: 121) [1]
“Col Byrd is very prodigal in Gates roads walks hedges & seeders [cedars] trimed finely & A little green house with 2 or 3 [orange] trees . . .”


  • September 25, 1748, Pehr Kalm, Travels into North America (1770, 1: 112-13) [2]
"Mr. John Bartram is an Englishman, who lives in the country about four miles from Philadelphia. He has acquired a great knowledge of natural philosophy and history, and seems to be born with a peculiar genius for these sciences.... He has in several successive years made frequent excursions into different distant parts of North America, with an intention of gathering all sorts of plants which are scarce and little known. Those which he found he has planted in his own botanical garden, and likewise sent over their seeds or fresh roots to England. We owe to him the knowledge of many scarce plants, which he first found, and which were never known before."


"I have met with very Little new in the Botanic way unless Your acquaintance Bartram, who is what he is & whose acquaintance alone makes amends for other dissapointments [sic] in that way.... His garden is a perfect portraiture of himself, here you meet wt. a row of rare plants almost covered over wt. weeds, here with a Beautiful Shrub, even Luxuriant Amongst Briars, and in another corner an Elegant & Lofty tree lost in common thicket — on our way from town to his house he carried me to severall rocks & Dens where he shewed me some of his rare plants, which he had brought from the Mountains &c. In a word he disdains to have a garden less than Pensylvania [sic] & Every den is an Arbour, Every run of water, a Canal, & every small level Sport a Parterre, where he nurses up some of his Idol Flowers & cultivates his darling production."
“Dear friend, I am going to build a greenhouse. Stone is got; and hope as soon as harvest is over to begin to build it, to put some pretty flowering winter shrubs, and plants for winter’s diversion; not to be crowded with orange trees, or those natural to the Torrid Zone, but such as will do, being protected from frost.”


  • December 3, 1762, describing Charleston, S.C. (quoted in Darlington 1849: 242–43) [4]
“I can’t find, in our country, that south walls are much protection against our cold, for if we cover so close as to keep out the frost, they are suffocated.”


“He [John Bartram] was, perhaps, the first Anglo-American who conceived the idea of establishing a BOTANIC GARDEN for the reception and cultivation of the various vegetables, natives of the country, as well as exotics, and of travelling for the discovery and acquisition of them.*
“* The BARTRAM BOTANIC GARDEN, (established in or about the year 1730,) is most eligibly and beautifully situated, on the right bank of the river Schuylkill, a short distance below the city of Philadelphia. Being the oldest establishment of the kind in this western world, and exceedingly interesting, from its history and associations,—one might almost hope, even in this utilitarian age, that, if no motive more commendable could avail, a feeling of state or city pride, would be sufficient to ensure its preservation, in its original character, and for the sake of its original objects. But, alas! there seems to be too much reason to apprehend that it will scarcely survive the immediate family of its noble-hearted founder,—and that even the present generation may live to see the accumulated treasures of a century laid waste—with all the once gay parterres and lovely borders converted into lumberyards and coal-landings.”

Images

References

Notes

  1. John Bartram, The Correspondence of John Bartram, 1734-1777, ed. by Edmund Berkeley and Dorothy Smith Berkeley (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1992), view on Zotero.
  2. Kalm, Peter [Pehr], Travels into North America: Containing Its Natural History, and a Circumstantial Account of Its Plantations and Agriculture in General, with the Civil, Ecclesiastical and Commercial State of the Country, the Manners of the Inhabitants, and Several Curious and Important Remarks on Various Subjects, trans. John Reinhold Forster, 3 vols. (London: John Reinhold Forster, 1770), 1, view on Zotero.
  3. Fry, 2004, view on Zotero.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 William Darlington, Memorials of John Bartram and Humphry Marshall: With Notices of Their Botanical Contemporaries (Philadelphia: Lindsay & Blakiston, 1849), view on Zotero.

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