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History of Early American Landscape Design

Difference between revisions of "Grotto"

[http://www.nga.gov/content/ngaweb/research/casva/research-projects.html A Project of the National Gallery of Art, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts ]
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==History==
 
==History==
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The term grotto was applied to a cave or cavern made by hollowing out the ground, as at the Woodlands, or digging into a bank or hillside, as at Lemon Hill and Monticello. While some grottos were formed out of a naturally occurring cavity or depression—as in the case of the grotto at Belfield—they could also be created artificially, complete with contiguous artificial rockwork [Fig. 1] or
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constructed simply as a stone summerhouse. They could also be made from a combination of natural and artificial elements. In 1771, for example, Thomas Jefferson described building up a natural cave with rock or clay, then
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covering it with moss or thatch.
  
 
==Texts==
 
==Texts==
  
 
==Images==
 
==Images==

Revision as of 19:50, February 26, 2015

History

The term grotto was applied to a cave or cavern made by hollowing out the ground, as at the Woodlands, or digging into a bank or hillside, as at Lemon Hill and Monticello. While some grottos were formed out of a naturally occurring cavity or depression—as in the case of the grotto at Belfield—they could also be created artificially, complete with contiguous artificial rockwork [Fig. 1] or constructed simply as a stone summerhouse. They could also be made from a combination of natural and artificial elements. In 1771, for example, Thomas Jefferson described building up a natural cave with rock or clay, then covering it with moss or thatch.

Texts

Images

Retrieved from "https://heald.nga.gov/mediawiki/index.php?title=Grotto&oldid=6912"

History of Early American Landscape Design contributors, "Grotto," History of Early American Landscape Design, , https://heald.nga.gov/mediawiki/index.php?title=Grotto&oldid=6912 (accessed January 21, 2022).

A Project of the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts

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