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History of Early American Landscape Design

Anthony St. John Baker

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Anthony St. John Baker (1785-May 16, 1854), was the English diplomat who carried the Treaty of Ghent to the United States at the close of the War of 1812. During his years of official service in Europe and America, he recorded his impressions in written accounts as well as watercolor sketches, ultimately publishing the autobiographical Mémoires d’un voyageur qui se repose (Memoirs of a Traveler Now in Retirement) in 1850.

Educated at Oxford, Baker began his diplomatic career in Europe. [1]

Terms

Arboretum, Arcade, Avenue, Bowling Green, Conservatory, Deer Park, Fall/Falling Garden, Fence, Ha-Ha/Sunk fence, Lawn, Nursery, Park, Plantation, Square, Statue, Sundial, Terrace/Slope Wall


Images


Sites

Riversdale, Mount Airy, White House

  1. James B. Childs, "Mémoires D’un Voyageur Qui Se Repose: A Bibliographical Interlude on an Elusive Foreign Service Officer’s Impressions of the United States, 1811-32," The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 64 (1970), 194, view on Zotero; Joseph Foster, Alumni Oxienses: The Members of the University of Oxford, 1715-1886, 4 vols. (London: Joseph Foster, 1887), 1: 50, view on Zotero; "Proceedings of the Numismatic Society. Session 1853-54," The Numismatic Chronicle and Journal of the Numismatic Society, 17 (1854–1855): 15 view on Zotero.

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History of Early American Landscape Design contributors, "Anthony St. John Baker," History of Early American Landscape Design, , https://heald.nga.gov/mediawiki/index.php?title=Anthony_St._John_Baker&oldid=5936 (accessed July 1, 2022).

A Project of the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts

National Gallery of Art, Washington