[[File:0326.jpg|thumb|Fig. 7, William Russell Birch, “The View from Springland,” in ''The Country Seats of the United States of North America'' (1808), pl. 2.]]
Another element of view-making was the use of barriers (such as [[wall]]s, [[fence]]s, and [[hedge]]s) to screen less [[picturesque]] elements of a [[plantation]]. This technique was reported in 1790 in a description of the Elias Hasket Derby Farm in Peabody, Mass. John Trumbull’s 1792 1793 plan for Yale College included instructions for a similar barrier that would provide a screen for the nose as well as the eyes. Inscribed on the plan is the directive that “The Temples of Cloacina [or priveys] (which it is too much the custom of New England to place conspicuously), I would wish to have concealed as much as possible, by planting a variety of Shrubs, such as Laburnums, Lilacs, Roses, Snowballs, Laurels, &c.”<ref>John Trumbull describing his plan for Yale College, New Haven, Connecticut. Yale University Library, Manuscripts and Archives, Yale Picture Collection, 48-A-46, box 1, folder 2.</ref>
[[File:0727.jpg|thumb|left|Fig. 8, Thomas Cole, ''Gardens of the Van Rensselaer Manor House'', 1840.]]
File:0278.jpg|Ralph Earl, ''Captain John Pratt (1753–1824)'', 1792.
File:0100.jpg|John Trumbull, Master Plan for Yale CollegeOld Brick Rowe, 17921793.
File:0522.jpg|Joseph Steward, ''John Phillips (1719–1795), Dartmouth Trustee, 1773–1793'', 1794–96.
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