:“And how shall we characterize the '''Dutch''' school, which even to this day, in the Low Countries, has scarcely given way to the continental admiration for the ‘''jardin Anglais'';’ this double distilled compound of labored symmetry, regularity, and stiffness, which seems to convey to the quiet owners so much pleasure, and to the tasteful traveller and critic so much despair! A stagnant and muddy [[canal]], with a [[bridge]] thrown over it, and often connected with a circular fish-[[pond]]; a grass [[slope]] and a mound of green turf, on which is a pleasure or banqueting house with gilt ornaments; numberless clipped trees, and every variety of [[trellis]]-work lively with green paint; in the foreground beds of gay bulbs and florists’ flowers, interspersed with huge orange trees in tubs, and in the distance smooth green [[meadow]]s—such are the unvarying features of the Hollander’s garden or grounds. The true Dutchman looks upon his garden as a quiet place to smoke and be ‘content’ in; if he lazily saunters through, it is rather to enjoy the gay pencillings of some new bed of tulips than to enjoy the elegance and harmony of its design, the variety of scenery, or the freshness and beauty of the foliage. At the same time, he is neither exclusive nor secret with the stores of enjoyment which he has within its bounds; and very many of the private villas near Rotterdam, and in other parts of Holland, have mottoes like those inscribed over the gateways—‘Tranquil and Content,’ ‘My desire is satisfied’—(''genegentheiel is volden'')—‘Friendship and sociability,’ and numerous others of a similar import. . .
:“Whatever may have been the absurdities of the ancient style, it is not to be denied that in connexion with highly decorated architecture, its effect, when in the best taste—as the Italian—is not only splendid and striking, but highly suitable and appropriate. Sir Walter Scott, in an essay on landscape embellishment, says, ‘if we approve of Palladian architecture, the vases and balustrades of Vitruvius, the enriched entablatures and superb stairs of the Italian school of gardening, we must not, on this account, be construed as vindicating the paltry imitations of the '''Dutch''', who clipped yews into monsters of every species, and relieved them with painted wooden figures. The distinction between the Italian and '''Dutch''' is obvious. A stone hewn into a gracefully ornamented [[vase]] or [[urn]], has a value which it did not before possess: a yew hedge clipped into a fortification, is only defaced. The one is a production of art, the other a distortion of nature. . .
<div id="Fig_6"></div>[[File:0370.jpg|thumb|Fig. 6, Anonymous, “The [[Geometric style]], from an old print,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'' (1849), p. 62, fig. 14. [[#Fig_6_cite|back up to History]]]]
:“The beauties elicited by the ancient style of gardening were those of regularity, symmetry, and the display of labored art. These were attained in a merely mechanical manner, and usually involved little or no theory. The geometrical form and lines of the buildings were only extended and carried out in the garden. In the best classical models, the art of the sculptor conferred dignity and elegance on the garden, by the fine forms of marble [[vase]]s and [[statue]]s; in the more intricate and labored specimens of the '''Dutch''' school prevalent in England in the time of William IV. . . the results evince a fertility of odd conceits, rather than the exercise of taste or imagination. Indeed, as, to level ground naturally uneven, or to make an [[avenue]], by planting rows of trees on each side of a broad [[walk]], requires only the simplest perception of the beauty of mathematical forms, so, to lay out a garden in the [[geometric style]], became little more than a formal routine, and it was only after the superior interest of a more natural manner was enforced by men of genius, that natural beauty of expression was recognised, and [[Landscape Gardening]] was raised to the rank of a fine art. . . [Fig. 6]
:“PLANTATIONS IN THE [[ANCIENT STYLE]]. In the arrangement and culture of trees and plants in the ancient style of [[Landscape Gardening]], we discover the evidences of the formal taste,— abounding with every possible variety of quaint conceits, and rife with whimsical expedients, so much in fashion during the days of Henry and Elizabeth, and until the eighteenth century in England, and which is still the reigning mode in Holland, and parts of France. In these gardens, nature was tamed and subdued, or as some critics will have it, tortured into every shaped which the ingenuity of the gardener could suggest; and such kinds of vegetation as bore the shears most patiently, and when carefully trimmed, assumed gradually the appearance of verdant [[statue]]s, pyramids, crowing cocks, and rampant lions, were the especial favorites of the gardeners of the old school.”

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