:“However, in small [[flower garden]]s and '''shrubberies''', the latter has to be adopted. In such places, tall growing kinds should never be introduced, unless merely as a screen from some disagreeable object, for they crowd and confuse the whole. The dwarf and more bushy sorts should be placed nearest to the eye, in order that they may conceal the naked stems of the others. Generally when shrubs are planted, they are small; therefore, to have a good effect from the beginning, they should be planted closer than they are intended to stand. When they have grown a few years, and interfere with each other, they can be lifted, and such as have died, or become sickly, replaced, and the remainder can be planted in some other direction. Keep them always distinct, one from another, in order that they may be the better shown off. But, if it is not desired that they should be thicker planted than it is intended to let them remain, the small growing kinds may be six or eight feet apart; the larger, or taller sorts, ten to twenty feet, according to the condition of the soil.
:“Thick masses of '''shrubbery''', called [[thicket]]s, are sometimes wanted. In these there should be plenty of evergreens. A mass of deciduous shrubs has no imposing effect during winter.”
 
*Barber, John Warner, 1844, describing the village of Roxbury in ''Historical collections, being a general collection of interesting facts, traditions, biographical sketches, anecdotes, &c.'' (1844: 65)<ref>John Warner Barber, ''Historical collections, being a general collection of interesting facts, traditions, biographical sketches, anecdotes, &c., relating to the history and antiquities of every town in Massachusetts, with geographical descriptions'', (1844): 65, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/F53ITP6J view on Zotero].</ref>
:"The numerous genteel residences and cottages, which are mostly built on wood and painted white, contrast strongly with the evergreens and '''shrubbery''', by which most of them are surrounded; and during the summer months, the appearance of this place is highly beautiful."
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