The meaning of the term flower garden remained relatively unchanged between 1650 and 1850, and the placement of the flower garden within a designed landscape, as well as the plants and their arrangement contained therein, helped distinguish it from other garden features. Although flowers might appear in [[kitchen garden]]s, the kitchen garden carried connotations of utility while the flower garden signified ornament and pleasure. Moreover, the flower garden required specialized care and expertise, as implied by Charles Carroll (of Annapolis) in his 1775 query about the training of a potential gardener.
[[File:0048.jpg|thumb|left|Fig. 1, John Nancarrow, ''"Plan of the [[Seat]] of John Penn jun’r: Esqr: in Blockley Township and County of Philadelphia,'' " c. 1785. The flower garden, “g,” is located at some distance from the main house.]]
The siting of the flower garden distinguished it from the [[kitchen garden]] and [[orchard]], which, as mainly utilitarian features, were often situated beyond the [[view]] of the main house. Flower gardens, in keeping with their ornamental function, were often placed in relative proximity to the most prestigious rooms of the house. In this location they could be viewed from the house and could act as adjuncts to reception and entertaining rooms. Some 18th-century British treatise writers stated that the flower garden should be situated at the “back-front” of the house, meaning the area adjacent to the rear of the house and often just below the [[terrace]]. Such a location also provided a degree of shelter conducive to nurturing plants.
Flower gardens also could be placed at some distance from the house. Batty Langley (1728), for example, advised situating the flower garden within a [[wilderness]]. At the [[seat]] of John Penn, near Philadelphia, the flower garden was located in a wooded area away from the mansion [Fig. 1]. This placement of the flower garden distinguished it from the [[parterre]], which, typically in the British and European context, was placed adjacent to the house. The 18th-century [[parterre]] used common plants, whereas the 18th-century flower garden was often devoted to exotic, unusual, or rare plants; hence [[Benjamin Henry Latrobe]] (1796) expressed disappointment in the flower garden at [[Mount Vernon]] because it contained “nothing very rare.” This “neat” layout arranged with precision met with [[Benjamin Henry Latrobe|Latrobe’s]] sarcasm as he described a [[parterre]] as “the expiring groans I hope of our Grandfather’s pedantry.” A sketch of [[John Bartram|John Bartram's]] famous garden depicts the botanist’s care and interest in “new flowers,” which were separated from the “common flower garden” [Fig. 2].
[[File:0056.jpg|thumb|right|Fig. 2, [[John Bartram|John]] or [[William Bartram]], ''"A Draught of [[Bartram_Botanic_Garden_and_Nursery|John Bartram’s House and Garden ]] as it appears from the River''", 1758. “New flower garden” upper left quadrant of the garden.]]
In England, long narrow [[bed]]s were associated with florists’ gardens, which were devoted to the cultivation of rare or “choice” flowers, also known as “florists’ flowers.” [[Bernard M’Mahon|Bernard M'Mahon's]] prescription in 1806 for a flower garden composed of narrow [[bed]]s and planted with bulbous and tuberous rooted flowers, “each sort principally in separate [[bed]]s,” suggests this English florist tradition.
:“6099. ''The [[green-house]] or [[conservatory]] is generally placed in the '''flower garden''''', provided these structures are not appended to the house. . .
:“6110. ''The manner of planting the herbaceous plants and [[shrub]]s in a '''flower-garden''''' depends jointly on the style and extent of the scene. With a view to planting, they may be divided into three classes, which classes are independently altogether of the style in which they are laid out. The first class is ''the general or mingled '''flower-garden''''', in which is displayed a mixture of flowers with or without flowering-[[shrub]]s according to its size. The object in this class is to mix the plants, as that every part of the garden may present a gay assemblage of flowers of different colors during the whole season. The second class is the ''select '''flower-garden''''', in which the object is limited to the cultivation of particular kinds of plants; as, florists’ flowers, American plants, annuals, bulbs, &c. Sometimes two or more classes are included in one garden, as bulbs and annuals; but, in general, the best effect is produced by limiting the object to one class only. The third class is ''the changeable '''flower garden''''', in which all the plants are kept in [[pot]]s, and reared in a flower-[[nursery]] or reserve-ground. As soon as they begin to flower, they are plunged in the [[border]]s of the '''flower-garden''', and, whenever they show symptoms of decay, removed, to be replaced by others from the same source. This is obviously the most complete mode of any for a display of flowers, as the beauties of both the ''general'' and ''particular'' gardens may be combined without presenting blanks, or losing the fine effect of assemblages of varieties of the same species; as of hyacinth, pink, dahlia, chrysanthemum, &c. The fourth class is ''the botanic '''flower-garden''''', in which the plants are arranged with reference to botanical study, or at least not in any way that has for its main object a rich display of blossoms. . .
[[File:1352.jpg|thumb|right|Fig. 7, [[J. C. Loudon]], Plan of The [[botanic garden|botanic flower garden]] with a circular gravel-[[walk]], in ''An Encyclopædia of Gardening'' (1826), 801, fig. 553.]]
:“6126. ''The botanic '''flower-garden''''' being intended to display something of the vegetable kingdom, as well as its resemblances and differences, should obviously be arranged according to some system or method of study. . . [For a private [[botanic garden]]] a gravel [[walk]] may be so contrived as to form a tour of all the groups [of species]. . . displaying them on both sides; in the centre, or in any fitting part of the scene, the botanic [[hot-house]]s may be placed; and the whole might be surrounded with a sloping phalanx of evergreen plants, [[shrub]]s, and trees. . . It is hardly necessary to observe that the above modes, or others that we have mentioned of planting a '''flower-garden''' are alike applicable to every form or style of laying out the garden or [[parterre]]. . . [Fig. 7]
:“7259. ''The '''flower-garden''''' should join both the [[conservatory]] and [[terrace]]; and, where the botanic stoves do not join the conservatory and the house, they, and also the [[aviary]] and other appropriate buildings and decorations, should be placed here.”
File:0016.jpg|Anonymous, ''Home of Richard Blow'', c. late 18th century.
File:0056.jpg|[[John Bartram|John]] or [[William Bartram]], ''"A Draught of John Bartram’s House and Garden as it appears from the River''", 1758. “New '''flower garden” garden'''” upper left quadrant of the garden.
File:0048.jpg| John Nancarrow, ''"Plan of the [[Seat]] of John Penn jun’r: Esqr: in Blockley Township and County of Philadelphia,'' " c. 1785. The '''flower garden''', “g,” is located at some distance from the main house.
File:1346.jpg|[[J. C. Loudon]], Plan of a '''flower garden''' with irregular [[border]]s, in ''An Encyclopædia of Gardening'', 4th ed. (1826), 791, fig. 540. The '''flower garden''' is indicated at ''a''.
File:1349.jpg|[[J. C. Loudon]], Plan of a '''flower garden''' in the old French style, in ''An Encyclopædia of Gardening'', 4th ed. (1826), 794, fig. 545.
File:1352.jpg|[[J. C. Loudon]], Plan of The [[Botanic garden|botanic '''flower garden''']] with a circular gravel-[[walk]], in ''An Encyclopædia of Gardening'', 4th ed. (1826), 801, fig. 553.
File:1373.jpg|[[J. C. Loudon]], “The house and '''flower-garden''' entrance,” in ''An Encyclopædia of Gardening'', 4th ed. (1826), 1026, fig. 729.
File:0996.jpg|Anonymous, “A Small Arabesque '''Flower Garden''',” in [[A. J. Downing]], ed., ''Horticulturist'' 2, no. 11 (May 1848): 504.
 
File:0969.jpg|[[Thomas Jefferson]], Plan of the grounds at [[Monticello]], 1806.
File:0997.jpg|Anonymous, “Design for a [[Geometric style|Geometric]] Flower Garden,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ed., ''Horticulturist'' 2, no. 12 (June 1848): 558, fig. 67.
File:1097.jpg|Thomas S. Sinclair, “Plan of the [[Pleasure ground/Pleasure garden|Pleasure Grounds]] and Farm of the [[Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane]] at Philadelphia,” in Thomas S. Kirkbride, ''American Journal of Insanity'' 4, no. 4 (April 1848): pl. opp. 280.
File:0378.jpg|Anonymous, “Plan of a Suburban Villa Residence,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'', 4th ed. (1849), 118, fig. 26."'''flower-garden''', ''f''."
File:0391.jpg|Anonymous, “The Irregular '''Flower-garden''',” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'', 4th ed. (1849), 428, fig. 76.
File:0393.jpg|Anonymous, “[[English style|English]] '''Flower-Garden''',” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'', 4th ed. (1849), 434, fig. 78.
File:2297.jpg|Matthew Vassar, ''Plan of Springside'', 1851. "'''Flower''' and [[Kitchen_garden|Kitchen '''Garden''']] (25)." File:0333.jpg|G. & F. Bill (firm), ''Birds eye [[view]] of [[Mount Vernon|Mt. Vernon]] the home of Washington'', c. 1859."12. '''Flower Garden'''."
</gallery>
File:0069.jpg|[[Samuel Vaughan]], Plan of [[Mount Vernon]], 1787.
 
File:0969.jpg|[[Thomas Jefferson]], Plan of the grounds at [[Monticello]], 1806.
File:0835.jpg|Anonymous, Plan of a '''Flower Garden''', in ''Magazine of Horticulture'' 6, no. 5 (May 1840): 187, fig. 6.
File:0394.jpg|Anonymous, “The Conservatory,” [[Montgomery Place]], in [[A. J. Downing]], ed., ''Horticulturist'' 2, no. 4 (October 1847): 159, fig. 28.
File:03620777.jpg|Anonymous[[Frances Palmer]], “Cottage Residence “Ground [[Plot]] of Wm4-1/4 Acres,” in William H. HRanlett, ''The Architect'', 2 vols. Aspinwall(1851), Esqvol.2,” in pl. 6. "The [[Alawn]] is on the north of the house. J. Downing]], .with '''flower gardens'''A Treatise . . . on the Theory south and Practice east." File:1039.jpg|Anonymous, The '''Flower-Garden''', in Joseph Breck, ''The '''Flower-Garden''': or, Breck’s Book of Landscape GardeningFlowers'', 4th ed. (18491841), pl. opp. 51, fig. 8frontispiece.
File:07771622.jpg|[[Frances Palmer]]Anonymous, “Ground [[Plot]] Gardens and Grounds of 4-1/4 Acres,” in William H. Ranletta Cottage Residence, ''The ArchitectHorticulturist,'', 2 volsVol. 7. No. 5 (1851May 1, 1852), vol. 2233, pl. 6. "The [[lawn]] is on the north of the house . . fig.with '''flower gardens'''. . . on the south and east102."
File:1039.jpg|Anonymous, The '''Flower-Garden''', in Joseph Breck, ''The '''Flower-Garden''': or, Breck’s Book of Flowers'' (1841), frontispiece.
</gallery>

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