*|Langley, Batty, 1728, ''New Principles of Gardening'' (1728; repr., 1982: Introduction, 195–203)<ref>Batty Langley, ''New Principles of Gardening, or The Laying out and Planting Parterres, Groves, Wildernesses, Labyrinths, Avenues, Parks, &c'' (London: A. Bettesworth and J. Batley, etc., 1728; repr. New York: Garland, 1982), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/MRDTAEKC view on Zotero].</ref>
:“Their [Nobility and Gentry of England] ''Wildernesses'' and '''''Groves''''' (when they planted any) were always placed at the most remote Parts of the Garden: So that before we can enter them, in the ''Heat of Summer'', when they are most useful, we are obliged to pass thro’ the ''scorching Heat of the Sun''.
:“Indeed, ’tis oftentimes necessary to place '''''Groves''''' and open ''Wildernesses'' in such remote Parts of Gardens, from whence ''pleasant [[Prospect]]s are taken''; but then we should always take care to plant ''proportionable [[Avenue]]s'' leading from the House to them, under whose ''Shade'' we might with Pleasure pass and repass at any time of the Day. . .
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