The patterns described in Dezallier d’Argenville's and Switzer’s treatises were achieved primarily with grass or turf, iron filings, smith’s dust, black earth, red sand, brick dust, gravel, and cockleshells, <span id="Quintinie_cite"></span>despite Jean de La Quintinie’s assertion in 1693 that parterres were [[flower garden]]s or flower [[plot]]s ([[#Quintinie|view text]]). In Dezallier d’Argenville's designs, flowers, yews, and other shrubs generally were relegated to the [[border]]. Only two of his designs—a parterre of cutwork for flowers and a parterre of orange trees—were devoted to flowers, [[shrub]]s, or trees. Although such parterres were not common in the North American context, prominent examples exist, such as the garden at the [[Governor’s House]] in New Bern, North Carolina, which bears a striking resemblance to plans found in British treatises [Fig. 2]. There are many reasons for their rarity. First, the cost was prohibitive for all but the most wealthy. Second, the formality and scale of parterre designs were often regarded as appropriate only to large houses, which were uncommon in the colonial world. Third, the shift away from the [[ancient style|ancient]] or [[geometric style]], in which parterres were featured prominently, began in British and colonial landscape aesthetics in the early 18th century.
<span id="Langley_cite"></span>In 1728, English writer [[Batty Langley]] discouraged the use of embroidery, compartiment, or cut-work parterres by proclaiming that the house should open onto a “plain” parterre—a bordered [[square]] of grass, perhaps with a [[basin]] in the center ([[#Langley|view text]]) [<span id="Fig_10_cite"></span>[[#Fig_10|See Fig. 10]]]. <span id="Miller_cite"></span>[[Philip Miller]] continued this trend in ''The Gardeners Dictionary'' (1733) ([[#Miller|view text]]). This mode of parterre design was an important antecedent to the practice of placing the house within a [[lawn]] setting.
<span id="Latrobe_cite"></span>The marked disfavor in which elaborate parterres were held in England by the end of the 18th century influenced the reception of them in America. English-born architect [[Benjamin Henry Latrobe]] (1796) disapproved of [[George Washington]]’s inclusion of a parterre in the form of a “richly flourishing Fleur de Lis” in the midst of his [[flower garden]], which was otherwise arranged in “[[square]]s, and boxed with great precision” ([[#Latrobe|view text]]). [[Benjamin Henry Latrobe|Latrobe]] complained that the parterre was old-fashioned, an opinion upheld by leading garden treatise writers. <span id="Marshall_cite"></span>British author [[Charles Marshall]] (1799) claimed that scrolls and flourishes typical of the embroidery, compartiment, or cut-work parterre “have got out of fashion, as a taste for open and extensive gardening has prevailed.” He recommended instead that parterres be made up of regularized [[bed]]s, neatly edged with box, and set within a squared [[plot]] ([[#Marshall|view text]]).
<div id="Fig_10"></div>[[File:1384.jpg|thumb|Fig. 10, [[Batty Langley]], One of two “Designs for Gardens that lye irregularly to the ground House. . . House opening to the North upon a plain Parterre of Grass,” in ''New Principles of Gardening'' (1728), pl. XI. [[#Fig_10_cite|back up to History.]]]]*<div id="Langley"></div>[[Batty Langley|Langley, Batty]], 1728, ''New Principles of Gardening'' (1728; repr., 1982: x, vi)<ref>Batty Langley, ''New Principles of Gardening, or The Laying out and Planting Parterres, Groves, Wildernesses, Labyrinths, Avenues, Parks, &c.'' (London: A. Bettesworth and J. Batley, etc., 1728; repr., New York: Garland, 1982), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/MRDTAEKC view on Zotero].</ref> [[#Langley_cite|back up to History]]
:“And the plainer '''''Parterres''''' are, the more Grandeur, for when they are stuff’d up with so many ''small Ornaments'', they ''break the Rays of Sight'', and the whole appears a Confusion. . . [Fig. 10]
:“And since '''''Parterres''''' are most beautiful when ''entirely plain'', I therefore recommend the removal of all Kinds of Ever-Greens from thence, and to have no more ''Gravel [[Walk]]s'' about them than are necessary for Use. . .
Image:1412.jpg|Stephen Switzer, “Designs for Parterre Quarters,” in ''Ichnographia Rustica'' (1718), vol. 2, pl. 29.
Image:1053.jpg|[[Batty Langley]], “Design of a ''rural Garden'', after the new manner,” in ''New Principles of Gardening'' (1728), pl. III. “Plate. III is the Design of a ''rural Garden'', after the new manner, where the front of the House opens upon a ''large plain Parterre''. . .”
Image:1383.jpg|[[Batty Langley]], One of two “Designs for Gardens that lye irregularly to the grand House. . . ,” in ''New Principles of Gardening'' (1728), pl. X. “In Plate X, the House opens. . . to the ''South'' upon the ''Parterre of Grass and Water'' C. . .”
Image:1384.jpg|[[Batty Langley]], One of two “Designs for Gardens that lye irregularly to the ground House . . . House opening to the North upon a plain Parterre of Grass,” in ''New Principles of Gardening'' (1728), pl. XI. House opens “to the ''North'' upon a ''plain Parterre of Grass'', and to the ''South'', upon a ''Parterre of Grass and Water''. . .”
Image:1385.jpg|[[Batty Langley]], “Design of a Small Garden Situated in a Park,” in ''New Principles of Gardening'' (1728), pl. XII. House opens “to the ''South'', on a ''grand Parterre of Grass''. . .”
Image:1338.jpg|[[J. C. Loudon]], Ground-lines of gardens and parterres, in ''An Encyclopædia of Gardening'', 4th ed. (1826), 375, figs. 361 and 362.
Image:0283.jpg|Anonymous, George Hayward (engraver), ''“The Duke’s Plan,” A Description of the Towne of Mannados: or New Amsterdam as it was in September 1661'', 1664; repr., 1859.
Image:1377.jpg|[[Batty Langley]], Garden with a canal, in ''New Principles of Gardening'' (1728), pl. IV.
Image:0017.jpg|Anonymous, Illustration of Williamsburg buildings, flora and fauna. Modern impression taken from the original 1740s copperplate [Bodleian Plate re-strike].

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