[[File:0462.jpg|thumb|right|Fig. 2, Samuel Vaughan, ''Warm or Berkley Springs, in Virginia'', from the diary of Samuel Vaughan, June–September 1787. Library of Congress Manuscript Washington, DC.]]
<span id="Vaughan_cite"></span>Bath’s streets took the form of a gridded plan arranged just below a large [[square]], as recorded by [[Samuel Vaughan]] in his diary in 1787 [Fig. 2] ([[#Vaughan|view text]]). In another sketch of Berkeley Springs, [[Samuel Vaughan|Vaughan]] observed the formation of islands surrounded by the warm spring’s flows, as well as the arrangement of the public baths[[bath]]s, noting a separate “[[Bath]] for Poor People [g]” [Fig. 3]. Separate [[bath]]s for men and women constructed in the [[square]] in 1786 were likely the work of James Rumsey (c. 1743–1792), an inventor, builder, and “jack-of-all-trades” who had opened a general store and boarding house in town in 1782.<ref>Harding 1976, 6, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/AZZ6ZIDM view in Zotero]; and Mabel Henshaw Gardiner and Ann Henshaw Gardiner, ''Chronicles of Old Berkeley: A Narrative History of a Virginia County from Its Beginnings to 1926 '' (Durham, NC: The Seeman Press, 1938), 222, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/DK298NQE view in Zotero]. The early bathhouses at Berkeley Springs were likely constructed by Rumsey, but this is not certain. See Taylor 2009, 57, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/WVDKWV33 view in Zotero].</ref>The so-called Roman Baths, which are still extant, are in a two-story brick building with a hipped roof that contains ten individual [[bath]] stalls built initially for use by men. Each stall is accessible by a private entrance from the long hallway that runs along the length of the first floor. On the building’s east elevation, a row of ten openings provides ventilation to each stall. The other extant eighteenth-century building, the old [[bathhouse]] or shower [[bath]], was initially constructed for women. The building, a one-story brick building with a hipped roof, is smaller.<ref> Taylor 2009, 56, https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/WVDKWV33; and Harding 1976, 2, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/AZZ6ZIDM view on Zotero].</ref> <span id="Vaughan_cite"></span>[[Samuel Vaughan|Vaughan]]'s textual description of Bath notes a flurry of building activity in the town’s early years, including 164 houses constructed over a four-year period, a playhouse, a Methodist church, and several taverns with [[piazza]]s that were among “the best calculated for America of any [he had] seen”([[#Vaughan|view text]]).
[[File:0461.jpg|thumb|left|Fig. 3, Samuel Vaughan, Plan of Bath (Berkeley Springs), VA [detail], 1787, from the diary of Samuel Vaughan, June-September 1787. Library of Congress Manuscript Washington, DC.]]
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