In addition to his international connections, [[Thomas Jefferson|Jefferson]] also helped M’Mahon secure his place within the American community of seedsmen and botanists. In the winter of 1806, just eight months after their correspondence had begun, [[Thomas Jefferson|Jefferson]] arranged for M’Mahon to become one of two recipients of the botanic specimens collected by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark during their expedition to the Pacific Ocean.<ref>Jefferson 1944, 328, 337, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/8ZA5VRP5/q/thomas%20jefferson's%20garden%20book view on Zotero].</ref> The other designated recipient was [[William Hamilton]], also based in the Philadelphia area at his estate [[The Woodlands]]. M’Mahon received seeds and specimens from the expedition in early 1807, and by 1808 he was growing as many as twenty species and six genera that were previously undescribed in the botanical literature.<ref>As quoted in Jefferson 1944, 345, 373, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/8ZA5VRP5/q/thomas%20jefferson's%20garden%20book view on Zotero].</ref> M’Mahon hired a German botanist named Frederick Pursh to describe and illustrate the specimens collected by Lewis sometime in the winter of 1807–1808, but the project stalled when Lewis’s health declined in 1808. Lewis proved unable to visit Philadelphia and answer questions about damaged specimens before he died in 1809. Pursh left Philadelphia with his notes and drawings, unpaid, and eventually published a description of the discoveries in England in December of 1813 without the permission of the remaining expedition team.<ref> Frederick Pursh, ''Flora Americae Septentrionalis; or, a Systematic Arrangement and Description of the Plants of North America,'' vol. 1, 2 vols. (London: White, Cochrane, & Co., 1814), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/KVNMM4KM/q/frederick%20pursh view on Zotero]. Cox 2004, 12, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/CHM5IVVN/q/i%20never%20yet%20parted view on Zotero].</ref> M’Mahon finally began selling plants from the expedition in 1812, advertising a variety of fragrant currant (''Ribes odoratissimum'') “collected by Messrs. Lewis and Clarke, on the shores of the rivers ''Columbia'' and ''Jefferson,'' and in the ''Rocky Mountains.''”<ref>M’Mahon regularly advertised in the Philadelphia ''Aurora,'' and the currant appears in the edition of March 11, 1812, as quoted in Cox 2004, 127, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/CHM5IVVN/q/i%20never%20yet%20parted view on Zotero].</ref> <span id="DemocraticPress_cite"></span>By the end of 1813 he had also relocated his shop from 39 South Second Street to 13 South Second Street, several blocks closer to the center of Philadelphia ([[#DemocraticPress|view text]]).
In 1808 M’Mahon purchased some land “on the township line road, near the Germantown road,” in the area of what is today Fotterall Square, where he opened a [[nursery]] and [[botanic garden]] called Upsal [[Botanic Garden]].<ref>John William Harshberger, ''The Botanists of Philadelphia and Their Work'' (Philadelphia: Press of T. C. Davis & Son, 1899), 117, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/6C7I6V7V/q/harshberger view on Zotero].</ref> Referencing the [[botanic garden]] of Uppsala University in Sweden restored by the celebrated botanist Carl Linnaeus (1707– 1778), the name of M'Mahon's nursery and garden revealed emphasized his knowledge of the history of botany and hint at his scientific ambitions. Although no descriptions of Upsal survive from M’Mahon’s lifetime, early histories and guides to the city briefly mention it as an attraction, including James Mease’s 1811 ''The Picture of Philadelphia.''<ref>James Mease, ''The Picture of Philadelphia: Giving an Account of Its Origin, Increase, and Improvements in Arts, Sciences, and Manufactures, Commerce and Revenue. With a Compendious View of Its Societies ...'' (Philadelphia: Published by B. & T. Kite, 1811), 351, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/5EXQKRJT/q/picture%20of%20philadelphia view on Zotero].</ref> <span id="Poulsons1818_cite"></span>The earliest extant description, written in 1818, two years after M’Mahon’s death, records about twenty acres of “variegated” land, with “an ample fish [[pond]] and island, supported by a never failing spring” on the property, and several buildings including a “two-storied stone dwelling; a brick and frame kitchen, a large stone building, [[Green House]], a frame stable, coach house, and out buildings” ([[#Poulsons1818|view text]]). With its [[pond]], mixed soils, and [[green house]], the land at Upsal must have afforded M’Mahon with diverse growing conditions for a wide variety of species. The garden continued to attract botanically-minded visitors in the decades following M’Mahon’s death, like the Scottish botanist David Douglas (1799–1834), who visited the property in 1823. <span id="Douglas_cite"></span>In his journal, Douglas briefly described Upsal’s Osage orange trees (''Maclura pomifera''), which were among the most celebrated specimens collected by the Lewis and Clark expedition ([[#Douglas|view text]]). <span id="Report1831_cite"></span>As late as 1830, visitors remarked on the “[[green house]] 60 feet long,” the “beautiful fish and water plants” with which the [[pond]] was stocked, and “a row of native oaks, planted by him [M’Mahon], containing 30 varieties; being all the kinds that he could collect in his day, either with money or zealous exertion” ([[#Report1831|view text]]).
''The American Gardener’s Calendar'' also outlived M’Mahon by several decades, reprinted in a total of eleven editions between 1806 and 1857 in Philadelphia. The ''Calendar'' provided readers with month-by-month instructions for the care and maintenance of [[kitchen garden]]s, [[orchard]]s, and [[nursery|nurseries]]. In both structure and content, it borrowed heavily from English garden manuals, and only lightly from American sources. M’Mahon himself admitted his admiration for the ''Gardener’s Dictionary'' by the English botanist Philip Miller (1691–1771).<ref>Sarah Pattee Stetson, “American Garden Books Transplanted and Native, before 1807,” ''William and Mary Quarterly'' 3, ser. 3 (1946): 366, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/QIREGNVP/q/transplanted%20and%20native view on Zotero].</ref> Other sources included John Abercrombie’s ''Every Many His Own Gardener,'' which provided a general structure for the work.<ref>For the most comprehensive analysis of his sources to date, see Brenda Bullion, “The Science and Art of Plants and Gardens in the Development of an American Landscape Aesthetic” (PhD diss., Cornell University, 1990), 293–95, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/9XGG8N2W/q/brenda%20bullion view on Zotero].</ref> M’Mahon was not, however, completely beholden to these English models. He cited Philadelphian John Beale Bordley’s 1799 ''Essays and Notes on Husbandry and Rural Affairs'' in his discussions of animal husbandry. The distinctly American perspective of the text appears most clearly in his discussion of indigenous flowering plants. <span id="Indigenous_cite"></span>Even before M’Mahon received specimens from the Lewis and Clark expedition, he pleaded with American gardeners to incorporate indigenous species in their ornamental plantings: “In Europe plants are not rejected because they are indigenous, on the contrary they are cultivated with due care; and yet here, we cultivate many foreign trifles, and neglect the profusion of beauties so bountifully bestowed upon us by the hand of nature” ([[#Indigenous|view text]]).

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