[[File:2201.jpg|thumb|left|Fig. 5, F. Walsh, “Water tower in the form of an Italian campanile,” in P. Barry, ed. ''Horticulturalist'' 3, n.s. (January-December 1853): p. 129]]
Supported by Donaldson’s wealth, the gardeners at Blithewood were able to experiment with novel techniques and share their findings. One gardener in particular, named George Kidd, was especially prolific in this regard. <span id="GeorgeKidd_cite"></span>He submitted a letter about his success growing potted grapes in [[Greenhouse|greenhouses]] ([[#GeorgeKidd|view text]]) and another about [[Kitchen garden|kitchen gardens]] to the Horticulturist in 1848, both with a practical eye toward localizing garden theory and practice for the colder climate of the Hudson.<ref>Geo. Kidd, “A Hint on Kitchen Gardens,” ''Horticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste'' 3, no. 10 (April 1849): 471–472, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/9G2UB2XS view on Zotero].</ref> Another one of his communications, published in 1849-1850, shared new techniques for cultivating roses.<ref>Geo. Kidd, “Domestic Notices: Budding Roses,” ''Horticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste'' 4, no. 5 (November 1849): 246, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/Z55KTVCE view on Zotero]. At some point after his employment at Blithewood, Kidd left New York for Columbus, Georgia, where he continued to contribute short articles on gardening techniques to publications. Geo. Kidd, “Editor’s Table: Dear Sir,” ''The Horticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste'' 7 (1857): 390, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/ZRTIIEAV view on Zotero]; Geo. Kidd, “The Scuppernong,” ''The Plantation'' 1, no. 12 (April 9, 1870): 180, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/SLRJNBDP view on Zotero]. It is not clear if he is the same George Kidd mentioned in relation to the London-based retirement charity known as the Gardeners’ Royal Benevolent Institution. G. Bond, “Gardeners’ Royal Benevolent Institution,” ''The Gardener’s Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette'', no. 29 (July 21, 1855): 487, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/D8WFN6W7 view on Zotero].</ref> Donaldson himself helped spread the knowledge he gained transforming Blithewood. His short letter to the ''Horticulturist'', published in 1853, describes the design and hydraulic engineering of a forty-five-foot-tall “tower in the form of an Italian campanile” at Blithewood [Fig. 5]. <span id="Campanile_cite"></span>This disguised water tower, which was filled by the Sawkill Creek on the boundary between Blithewood and [[Montgomery Place]], supplied water for “irrigation, the cattle yard, stable, the garden, the house and [[Fountain|fountains]]” and served “also as a [[Belvedere/Prospect tower/Observatory|prospect tower]]” ([[#Campanile|view text]]).
[[File:1907.jpg|thumb|Fig. 6, Anonymous, “Implement in use at Blithewood for cleaning gravel roads,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'' (1849) p. 532, fig. 20.]]
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