:“M’Mahon, already mentioned, is a seedsman at Philadelphia, and ‘has connected with the seed-trade a botanical, agricultural, and horticultural book-store.’ His work is the first of the kind which has appeared in America, and includes every department to be found in our calendars. Ample instructions are given for growing the pine, vine, melon, and other delicate fruits, and also for the forcing departments both of the [[Flower garden|flower]] and [[kitchen garden]]s; but we cannot gather from the work any thing as to the extent of American practice in these particulars.”
*<div id="Douglas"></div>Douglas, David, August 22, 1823, describing his visit to Upsal [[Botanic Garden]] (1914: 8)<ref>David Douglas, ''Journal Kept by David Douglas During His Travels in North America 1823-1827 1823–1827 Together with a Particular Description of Thirty-Three Species of American Oaks and Eighteen Species of Pinus, with Appendices Containing a List of the Plants Introduced by Douglas and an Account of His Death in 1834'' (London: W. Wesley & Son, for the Royal Historical Society, 1914), 8, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/GVY4XWI3/q/david%20douglas view on Zotero].</ref> [[#Douglas_cite|back up to History]]
:“Friday, August 22nd.
:“. . . . I made a journey to Mr. McMahon, which is three miles north of the city. I did not find him at home; I looked round the garden, and after a patient search found Maclura, two plants, height about seventeen feet, bushy and rugged; they had a few fruits on the trees; it is well described in Pursh’s Preface of his ‘Flora Amer.’ Then I called at [[Bartram Botanic Garden and Nursery|Bartram’s old place]], but found no person at home.”
:“Attached to this establishment is a Seed Store, in Second below Market street, where there is sold an extensive variety of seeds, foreign and native, to the amount of 2,000 kinds; with a variety of horticultural implements, and a collection of botanical and horticultural books.”
*Wynne, William, 1832, “Some Account of the Nursery Gardens and the State of Horticulture in the Neighbourhood of Philadelphia,” describing Hibbert [[Nursery]], vicinity of Philadelphia, Pa. (''Gardener’s Magazine'' 8: 273)<ref>William Wynne, “Some Account of the Nursery Gardens and the State of Horticulture in the Neighbourhood of Philadelphia, with Remarks on the Subject of the Emigration of British Gardens to the United States,” ''The Gardener’s Magazine and Register of Rural & Domestic Improvement'' 8, no. 38 (June 1832): 273. , [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/CKN7ZG86/q/william%20wynne view on Zotero].</ref>
:“A Mr. Hibbert keeps a small [[nursery]], in which he grows roses and other plants in pots, which he sells chiefly in the city market. I understand Mr. Hibbert has taken a piece of ground formerly occupied as a [[nursery]] by Mr. M’Mahon, and has taken into partnership [[Robert Buist|Mr. Buist]], a gardener in the neighbourhood.”
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