The rustic style suited the [[picturesque]] mode of [[landscape gardening]] (also known as the modern or [[natural style]]), which derived from the aesthetic discovery of the countryside and rural life in the late 18th and 19th centuries.<ref>Ann Bermingham, ''Landscape and Ideology: The English Rustic Tradition, 1740–1860'' (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1986), 10, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/K83FQJE5 view on Zotero].</ref> [[J.C. Loudon|Loudon’s]] extensive discussion of the rustic exemplified this cultural trend. At times, the terms “grotesque” and “rustic” were used synonymously to denote an unrefined, common appearance. [[J. C. Loudon|Loudon]] also used the words “rural” and “indigenous” as alternatives to “rustic,” to refer to the imitation of local scenery. The [[modern style]] dominated landscape taste in America after the Revolution, as illustrated by the numerous 19th-century descriptions and citations of the rustic that are included in this study.
[[A. J. Downing|Downing]], who played an important role in the popularization of the “rural taste” in America, championed rusticity in the embellishment of gardens and homes. His publications provided many examples of rustic furniture and architecture, as well as advice on their materials, siting, and construction. He depended frequently upon [[J. C. Loudon|Loudon’s]] publications, which he credited as his source. In an issue of the ''Horticulturist'' (January 1850), the writer Jeffreys, from New York, associated rusticity with rural taste: “A true country house should also have some appearance of rusticity—not vulgarity—but a keeping with all which surround it. Not castellated, nor magnificent; neither ostentatious nor pretending, but plain, dignified, quiet, and unobtrusive; yet of ample dimensions, and exceeding convenience. Then, in [[park]] or [[lawn]], on hill or plain, flanked with mossy foliage, and well kept grounds, it becomes a perfect picture in a finished landscape.” To this pronouncement, the editor, [[A. J. Downing|Downing]], added “[Most excellent and sensible. ED.].”<ref>Jeffreys[pseud.], “Critique on November Horticulturist,” ''The Horticulturistand Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste'' 4 , no. 7 (January 1850): 311–12, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/9A7JZZ9T/q/critique view on Zotero].</ref>
—''Therese O’Malley''
*Rusticus [pseud.], August 1846, “Design for a Rustic Gate” (''Horticulturist'' 1: 72)<ref>Rusticus [pseud]., “Design for a Rustic Gate,” ''The Horticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste'' 1 , no. 2 (August 1846): 72–73, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/DPX658P3 view on Zotero].</ref>
:“Indeed, '''rustic''' work of all kinds is extremely pleasing in any situation where there is any thing like a wild or natural character; or even where there is a simple and '''rustic''' character. In the immediate proximity of a highly finished villa, it strikes me that '''rustic''' work, such as [[arbor]]s, [[fence]]s, flower baskets and the like, are rather out of place. The sculptured [[vase]] of marble, or terra cotta, would appear to be the most in keeping with an elegant place of the first class; that is to say, for all situations very near the house. In wooded [[walk]]s, or secluded spots, '''rustic''' work looks well always.”
[[File:0949.jpg|thumb|Fig. 13, Anonymous, “Rustic Arbours,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ed., ''The Horticulturist'' 4, no. 7 (January 1850): pl. opp. 297.]]*Anonymous, January 1850, “A Few Words on Rustic Arbours” (''Horticulturist'' 4: 320)<ref>Anonymous, “A Few Words on Rustic Arbours,” ''The Horticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste'' 4 , no. 7 (January 1850): 320–21, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/6VBVIQK7/ view on Zotero].</ref>
:“The most useful and most agreeable of all these [rustic seats], is the simple '''''rustic''''' [[arbor]], with projecting roof, covered with thatch or bark. I send you herewith (see FRONTISPIECE) sketches of two of these, copied from a French volume on garden decorations. I have had one of these executed in a secluded spot, and the effect is highly satisfactory, and a covered arbor like this is agreeable at all seasons of the year, when a walk in the garden is sought after.
:“'''Rustic''' work, made of branches of trees indiscriminately, and exposed to the full action of the weather, perishes very speedily. But if it is protected from the rains by being under the shelter of an overhanging roof, as for example, covered like these [[arbor]]s, it will last from 10 to 15 years without repairs. But by far the best material, where it can be obtained, is the wood of red cedar, as it will endure for 20 years or more. The stems of young cedars are usually straight, and may be split in halves so as to form excellent pieces for forming the inlaying or panel work of the insides of '''rustic''' [[arbor]]s, as shown in the figures; and the larger limbs will form good [[Pillar|pilars]] and lattice work for the open portions of the exterior. The frame of such [[arbor]]s as these, is made by setting posts, cedar or other, with the bark on, at the corners, and then nailing rough boards between the posts, in those compartments that are to be worked close. Over these boards the halved or split rods, (those from one to two inches in diameter, are preferable,) are nailed on so as to form any pleasing patterns which the taste or fancy may dictate.” [Fig. 13]
File:0400.jpg|Anonymous, “A rustic bridge,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'', 4th ed. (1849), 461, fig. 89.
File:0949.jpg|Anonymous, “Rustic Arbours,” in [[A. J. Downing]], ed., ''The Horticulturist'' 4, no. 7 (January 1850): pl. opp. 297.
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