*[[C. M. Hovey|Hovey, C. M.]], October 1839, “Some Remarks upon Several Gardens and Nurseries in Providence, Burlington, (N.J.) and Baltimore,” describing the residences of Charles Phelps, Esq., Stonington, CT, and Horace Binney, Burlington, NJ (''Magazine of Horticulture'' 5: 363)<ref>Charles Mason Hovey, “Some Remarks upon Several Gardens and Nurseries, in Providence, Burlington, (N.J.) and Balitmore,” ''The Magazine of Horticulture, Botany, and All Useful Discoveries and Improvements in Rural Affairs'' 5 , no. 10 (October 1839): 361–76, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/N4I3HBZD view on Zotero].</ref>
:“The '''flower garden''' contains about a [[quarter]] of an acre, in front of the house, and between that and the road, and is walled in on the north and west side. It is tastefully laid out in small [[bed]]s, [[Edging|edged]] with box; on the north side stands a moderately sized [[green-house]], about forty feet long.”
:“The '''flower garden''' is nearly a [[square]], and is laid out with one main circular [[walk]], running round the whole, and a [[border]] for flowers on each side; the centre forming a [[lawn]] scattered over with several large fruit trees.”
[[File:0878.jpg|thumb|right|Fig. 4, Anonymous, “Ground Plan of a portion of [[A. J. Downing|Downing’s]] [[Botanic Garden]]s and [[nursery|Nurseries]],” in ''Magazine of Horticulture'' 7 , no. 11 (November 1841): 404.]]*[[C. M. Hovey|Hovey, C. M.]], November 1841, “Select Villa Residences,” describing Highland Place, estate of [[A. J. Downing]], Newburgh, NY (''Magazine of Horticulture'' 7: 406–9)<ref>Charles Mason Hovey, “Select Villa Residences, with Descriptive Notices of Each; Accompanied with Remarks and Observations on the Principles and Practice of Landscape Gardening: Intended with a View to Illustrate the Art of Laying Out, Arranging, and Forming Gardens and Ornamental Grounds,” ''The Magazine of Horticulture, Botany, and All Useful Discoveries and Improvements in Rural Affairs'' 7 , no. 11 (November 1841): 401–11, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/SXS8ZS3J view on Zotero].</ref>
:“18. '''Flower garden''', in front of the [[greenhouse]]. It is laid out in circular [[bed]]s, [[Edging|edged]] with box, with gravel [[walk]]s. Under the [[arbor]] vitae [[hedge]], which is here planted against the boundary line, the [[green-house]] plants are principally placed during summer. . . .
:“the '''flower garden''' (18,) a small space laid out with seven circular [[bed]]s; the centre one nearly twice as large as the outer ones: these were all filled with plants: a running rose in the centre of the large bed, and the outer [[edging|edge]] planted with fine phloxes, Bourbon roses, &c.: the other six beds were all filled with similar plants, excepting the running rose, which would be of too vigorous growth for their smaller size. Under the [[arbor]] vitae [[hedge]] here, on the south side of the garden, the [[green-house]] plants were arranged in rows, the tallest at the back.” [Fig. 4]
*B., P., January 1844, “Progress of Horticulture in Rochester, N.Y.” (''Magazine of Horticulture'' 10: 17)<ref>P. B., “Progress of Horticulture in Rochester, N.Y.,” ''The Magazine of Horticulture, Botany, and all Useful Discoveries and Improvements in Rural Affairs'' 10 , no. 1 (January 1844), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/W3UKEX82 view on Zotero].</ref>
:“'''Flower gardens''' and [[shrubberies]] are no longer objects of amazement; [[avenue]]s of forest trees are not uncommon sights in the vicinity of dwellings; in fact the general neatness that pervades this beautiful section of country cannot fail to suggest to the traveller the steady march of taste and refinement, and the progress, though slow, of that art that transforms the wildest forest into a very Eden.”
*[[C. M. Hovey|Hovey, C. M.]], December 1849, describing Oatlands, residence of D. P. Manice, Hempstead, NY (''Magazine of Horticulture'' 15: 529–31)<ref>Charles Mason Hovey, “Notes of a Visit to Oatlands, Hempstead, L.I., N.Y., the Residence of D. F. Manice, Esq.,” ''The Magazine of Horticulture, Botany, and All Useful Discoveries and Improvements in Rural Affairs'' 15 , no. 12 (December 1849): 529–33, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/ZIRK5R8N view on Zotero].</ref>
:“The house is a handsome building, in a kind of castellated gothic, standing about fifty feet from the road, with the [[conservatory]] and [[hothouse]], and '''flower garden''' on the left,—the [[kitchen garden]] and forcing-houses on the right,—and the [[lawn]] and [[pleasure ground]], in the rear of the house, separating it from the [[park]]. . . .
:“Continuing our [[walk]] about the grounds, we entered the '''flower garden''', which is laid out in [[bed]]s, bordered with box; the dahlias were about all that remained in bloom at this late season, save here and there a stray rose.”
*W., M. A., February 1840, “On Flower Beds” (''Magazine of Horticulture'' 6: 51–52)<ref>M. A. W., “On Flower Beds,” ''The Magazine of Horticulture, Botany, and All Useful Discoveries and Improvements in Rural Affairs'' 6 , no. 2 (February 1840): 51–54, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/6F4WDBVV view on Zotero].</ref>
:“The laying out of a flower knot, or system of [[bed]]s in a '''flower garden''', is one of the first feats in which the young gardener undertakes to show off his abilities; and being one which affords the most ample scope for the play of fancy, is therefore, perhaps, the one in which he is most likely to manifest the display of a bad taste. Even where the design is of the most happy conception, and the plotting beautiful upon paper, the difficulty of defining and preserving accurately the outline of the figure, when practically applied, will often quite destroy the anticipated pleasing effect. [[Edging|Edge]]-boards of wood, so thin as to be easily bent to the required form, are commonly the first material employed. These soon warped out of shape, or quickly rot, and impart a deleterious principle to the soil in contact with them; and a very common fault is to have them too wide, so that the plants in the [[bed]]s suffer from drought, while the paths between them resemble gutters more than [[walk]]s for pleasure.”
[[File:0835.jpg|thumb|right|Fig. 8, Anonymous, Plan of a Flower Garden, in ''Magazine of Horticulture'' 6, no. 5 (May 1840): 187, fig. 6.]]
[[File:1750.jpg|thumb|right|Fig. 9, Anonymous, Plan of a Flower Garden, in ''Magazine of Horticulture'' 6, no. 5 (May 1840): 187, fig. 7.]]
*[[C. M. Hovey|Hovey, C. M.]], May 1840, “On the Cultivation of Annual Flowers” (''Magazine of Horticulture'' 6: 186–87)<ref>C. M. Hovey, “On the Cultivation of Annual Flowers,” ''The Magazine of Horticulture, Botany, and all Useful Discoveries and Improvements in Rural Affairs'' 6 , no. 5 (May 1840), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/8QC94QDP/q/On%20the%20Cultivation%20of%20Annual%20Flowers view on Zotero].</ref>
:“In the two following plans . . . we have shown the manner in which '''flower gardens''' may be laid out, either for the cultivation of a miscellaneous collection of bulbs, perennials and annuals, a collection of perennials and annuals together, a collection of annuals and [[green-house]] and frame plants turned out of the [[pot]]s into the soil, or for a collection of annuals alone. The situation decided upon should be, if possible, near to or in front of the [[green-house]] or [[conservatory]], or, if there are neither of these attached to the garden, near to the house, where it can be seen from the drawing-room or library; but, as in most gardens, there is space afforded in front of the [[green-house]], that is certainly the best place. Its size may be regulated altogether by the taste and desire of the owner; it may be the full length of the [[conservatory]] and in the form of a parallelogram, or it may be exactly a [[square]], or its form may be regulated by the space, aspect, &c.
:“In the two plans annexed, we have supposed the '''flower garden''' to be situated directly in front of the [[green-house]] and to be just the same length, (thirty-two feet, the ordinary length of a common sized house,) and width; the [[bed]]s should be laid out with care, as on their precision much of their beauty depends: the [[bed]]s may be surrounded with box [[edging]], and gravel [[walk]]s between, or they may be [[Edging|edged]] with what we have found to answer a good purpose, Iceland moss. This forms a perpetual [[green]], and, if kept neatly trimmed, is full as desirable an [[edging]] around such common [[bed]]s as the box: supposing this to be ALL completed, we next come to the planting of [[bed]]s. This, as we have just observed, may be devoted wholly to annuals, to annuals and perennials, and to both, with the addition of tender plants, such as verbenas, &c. &c.; but we shall at present speak of them as only to be filled with annuals.” [Figs. 8 and 9]
*[[C. M. Hovey|Hovey, C. M.]], January 1844, “Retrospective View of the Progress of Horticulture for 1843” (''Magazine of Horticulture'' 10: 9)<ref>C. M. Hovey, “Retrospective View of the Progress of Horticulture for 1843,” ''The Magazine of Horticulture, Botany, and all Useful Discoveries and Improvements in Rural Affairs'' 10 , no. 1 (January 1844), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/keywords_in_early_american_landscape_design/items/itemKey/E2273B6C view on Zotero].</ref>
:“In planting '''flower gardens''', artistical effect is but little attended to. It is here, however, that amateurs often have the means of making a great deal out of a small spot of ground; [[lawn]]s and [[pleasure ground]]s are only the accompaniments of the villa, while the '''flower garden''' is an appendage to almost every residence. To lay it out and plant in a judicious manner is consequently an object of importance.”
File:1373.jpg|[[J. C. Loudon]], “The house and flower-garden entrance,” in ''An Encyclopædia of Gardening'' (1826), 1026, fig. 729.
File:0878.jpg|Anonymous, “Ground Plan of a portion of [[A. J. Downing|Downing’s]] [[Botanic Garden]]s and [[nursery|Nurseries]],” in ''Magazine of Horticulture'' 7 , no. 11 (November 1841): 404.
File:1050.jpg|Richard Dolben, “Plan for Flower Garden,” 1847.

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