:"115. ''The Dutch are generally considered as having a particular taste'' in gardening, yet their [[Dutch style|gardens]], Hirschfeld observes, appear to differ little in design from [[French style|those]] of the French. The characteristics of both are symmetry and abundance of ornaments. The only difference to be remarked is, that the gardens of Holland are more confined, more covered with frivolous ornaments, and intersected with still, and often muddy pieces of water. . . .
:"116. ''Grassy [[slope]]s and green [[terrace]]s and [[walk]]s'' are more common in Holland than in any other country of the continent, because the climate and soil are favourable for turf; and these verdant [[slope]]s and [[mound]]s may be said to form, with their oblong [[canal]]s, the characteristics of the [[Dutch style]] of laying out grounds."
 
[[File:1795.jpg|thumb|Fig. 3, J. C. Loudon, "A plan of a Chinese garden and dwelling," in ''An Encyclopaedia of Gardening'' (1826), p. 103, fig. 37.]]
[[File:1831a.jpg|thumb|Fig. 39, J. C. Loudon, Statue of classical interest, in ''An Encyclopaedia of Gardening'' (1826), p. 810, fig. 564.]]
[[File:1831b.jpg|thumb|Fig. 40, J. C. Loudon, Statue of geographical interest, in ''An Encyclopaedia of Gardening'' (1826), p. 810, fig. 565.]]
:"6158. ''[[Statue]]s, whether of classical or geographical interest'' (''figs''. 564. and 565.), ''[[urn]]s, inscriptions, busts, monuments'', &c. are materials which should be introduced with caution. None of the others require so much taste and judgement to manage them with propriety. The introduction of [[statue]]s, except among works of the most artificial kind, such as fine architecture, is seldom or never allowable; for when they obtrude themselves among natural beauties, they always disturb the train of ideas which ought to be excited in the mind, and generally counteract the character of the scenery. In the same way, busts, [[urn]]s, monuments, &c. in [[flower gardensgarden|flower-gardens]], are most generally misplaced. The obvious intention of these appendages is to recall to mind the virtues, qualities, or actions of those for whom they were erected: now this requires time, seclusion, and undisturbed attention, which must either render all the flowers and other decoration of the ornamental garden of no effect; or, if they have effect, it can only be to interrupt the train of ideas excited by the other. As the garden, and the productions of nature, are what are intended to interest the spectator, it is plain that the others should not be introduced. [Figs. 39 and 40]
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J. C. (John Claudius) Loudon

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