:"115. ''The [[Dutch style|Dutch]] are generally considered as having a particular taste'' in gardening, yet their gardens, Hirschfeld observes, appear to differ little in design from those of the [[French style|French]]. The characteristics of both are symmetry and abundance of ornaments. The only difference to be remarked is, that the gardens of Holland are more confined, more covered with frivolous ornaments, and intersected with still, and often muddy pieces of water. . . .
:"116. ''Grassy [[slope]]s and green [[terrace]]s and [[walk]]s'' are more common in Holland than in any other country of the continent, because the climate and soil are favourable for turf; and these verdant [[terrace/slope|slope]]s and [[mound]]s may be said to form, with their oblong [[canal]]s, the characteristics of the [[Dutch style]] of laying out grounds."
:"''The first work after a settlement'' [in North America] is to plant a peach and apple [[orchard]], placing the trees alternately. The peach, being short-lived, is soon removed, and its place covered by the branches of the apple-trees."
:"486. ''Forest trees''. . . . From the Transactions of the Society of Agriculture of New York, we learn, that hawthorn [[hedge]]s and other live [[fence]]s are generally adopted in the cultivated districts; but the time is not yet arrived for forming timber-[[plantationsplantation]]s."
:"''The square [[pot]]'' is preferred by some for the three smallest sizes of [[pot]]s, as containing more earth in a given surface of shelf or basis; but they are more expensive at first, less convenient for shifting, and, not admitting of such perfection of form as the circle, do not, in our opinion, merit adoption. They are used in different parts of Lombardy and at Paris.
:"''The classic [[pot]]'' is the common material formed into [[vase]]s, or particular shapes, for aloes and other plants which seldom require shifting, and which are destined to occupy particular spots in gardens or [[conservatory|conservatories]], or on the [[terrace|terraces]] s and parapets of mansions in the summer season.
:"''The Chinese [[pot]]'' is generally glazed, and wide in proportion to its depth; but some are widest below, with the saucer attached to the bottom of the [[pot]], and the slits on the side of the pot for the exit or absorption of the water. Some ornamental Chinese [[pot]]s are squared at top and bottom, and bellied out in the middle.
:"1500. ''Moveable [[edging]]s'' to [[border]]s, [[bed]]s, or patches of flowers, are of different species.
:"1501. ''The basket-[[edging]]'' (''fig''. 219.) is a rim or fret of iron-wire, and sometimes of laths; formed, when small, in entire pieces, and when large, in segments. Its use is to enclose dug spots on lawns, so that when the flowers and [[shrubs]] cover the surface, they appear to grow from, or give some allusion to, a basket. These articles are also formed in cast-iron, and used as [[edging]]s to [[bed]]s and [[plot]]s, in plant-stoves and [[conservatory|conservatories]].
:"1502. ''The earthenware [[border]]'' (''fig''. 220.) is composed of long narrow plates of common tile-clay, with the upper edge cut into such shapes as may be deemed ornamental. They form neat and permanent [[edging]]s to [[parterre]]s; and are used more especially in Holland, as casings, or borderings to [[bed]]s of florists’ flowers. [Fig. 5]
:"1763. ''The verdant [[aviary]]'' is that in which, in addition to houses for the different sorts of birds, a net or wire curtain is thrown over the tops of trees, and supported by light posts or hollow rods, so as to enclose a few poles, or even acres of ground, and water in various forms. In this the birds in fine weather sing on the trees, the aquatic birds sail on the water, or the gold-pheasants stroll over the [[lawn]], and in severe seasons they betake themselves to their respective houses or cages. Such an enclosed space will of course contain evergreen, as well as deciduous trees, rocks, reeds, aquatics, long grass for larks and partridges, spruce firs for pheasants, furzebushes for linnets, &c. . . .
:"1764. ''Gallinaceous [[aviary]]''. At Chiswick, portable netted enclosures, from ten to twenty feet square, are distributed over a part of the [[lawn]], and display a curious collection of domestic fowls. In each enclosure is a small wooden box or house for sheltering the animals during the night, or in severe weather, and for breeding. Each cage or enclosure is contrived to contain one or more trees or [[shrubs]]; and water and food are supplied in small basins and appropriate vessels. Curious varieties of aquatic fowls might be placed on floating [[aviary|aviaries]] on a [[lake]] or [[pond]]. . . .
[[File:1328.jpg|thumb|Fig. 16, J. C. Loudon, "The Swiss bridge," in ''An Encyclopaedia of Gardening'' (1826), p. 350, fig. 312.]]
:"1789. ''[[Bridge]]s of masonry'' . . . may either have raised or flat roads; but in all cases those are the most beautiful (because most consistent with utility) in which the road on the [[arch]] rises as little above the level of the road on the shores as possible. . . .
:"1790. ''Cast-iron [[bridgesbridge]]s'' are necessarily curved; but that curvature, and the lines which enter into the architecture of their rails, may be varied according to taste or local indications. . . .
[[File:1330.jpg|thumb|Fig. 18, J. C. Loudon, Examples of gates, in ''An Encyclopaedia of Gardening'' (1826), p. 353, figs. 319–321.]]
:"1810. [[Alcove]]s (''fig''. 331.) are used as winter resting places, as being fully exposed to the sun. . . .[Fig. 21]
:"1811. ''[[arbor|Arbors]]'' are used as summer seats and resting-places: they may be shaded with fruit-trees, as the vine, currant, cherry; climbing ornamental [[shrubs]], as ivy, clematis, &c.; or herbaceous, as everlasting pea, gourd, &c. They are generally formed of timber lattice-work, sometimes of woven rods, or wicker-work, and occasionally of wire.
[[File:1333.jpg|thumb|Fig. 22, J. C. Loudon, "The Italian Arbor" and "The French Arbor," in ''An Encyclopaedia of Gardening'' (1826), p. 356, figs. 332 and 333.]]
:"6080. ''In exposure and aspect'', the [[flower garden|flower-garden]] should be laid out as much as possible on the same principles as the [[kitchen garden|kitchen-garden]]. . . .
:"6081. ''The extent'' of the [[flower garden|flower-garden]] depends jointly on the general scale of the residence, and the particular taste of the owner. If any proportion may be mentioned, perhaps, a fifth part of the contents of the [[kitchen garden|kitchen-garden]] will come near the general average; but there is no impropriety in having a large [[flower garden|flower-garden]] to a small [[kitchen garden|kitchen-garden]]. . . . As moderation, however, is generally found best in the end, we concur with the author of the ''Florist’s Manual'', when she states, that ‘. . . If the form of ground, where a [[parterre]] is to be situated, is sloping, the size should be larger than when a flat surface, and the [[border]]s of various shapes, and on a bolder scale, and intermingled with grass; but such a [[flower garden|flower-garden]] partakes more of the nature of [[pleasure garden|pleasure-ground]] than of the common [[parterre]], and will admit of a judicious introduction of flowering [[shrubs]].’ . . .
[[File:1346.jpg|thumb|Fig. 28, J. C. Loudon, Plan of a flower garden with irregular borders, in ''An Encyclopaedia of Gardening'' (1826), p. 791, fig. 540.]]
:"6086. ''Water''. This material, in some form or other, is as essential to the [[flower garden|flower]] as to the [[kitchen garden|kitchen-garden]]. Besides the use of the element in common culture, a [[pond]] or [[basin]] affords an opportunity of growing some of the more showy aquatics, while [[jet]]s, dropping-[[fountains]], and other forms of displaying water, serve to decorate and give interest to the scene. . . .
:"6087. ''The form'' of a small garden . . . will be found most pleasing when some regular figure is adopted, as a circle, oval, octagon, crescent, &c.: but where the extent is so great as not readily to be caught by a single glance of the eye, an irregular shape is generally more convenient, and it may be thrown into agreeable figures, or component scenes, by the introduction of [[shrubs]] so as to subdivide the space. . . .
:"6090. ''Boundary [[fence]], or screen''. [[Parterre]]s on a small scale may be enclosed by an evergreen [[hedge]] of holly, box, laurel, privet, juniper, laurustinus, or Irish whin . . . but irregular figures, especially if of some extent, can only be surrounded by a [[shrubbery]], such as we have already hinted at (6082.) as forming a proper shelter for [[flower garden|flower-gardens]]. . . .
* Part III, Book II, Chapter II (pp. 797–798, 800–801)
:"6110. ''The manner of planting the herbaceous plants and [[shrubs]] in a [[flower garden|flower-garden]]'' depends jointly on the style and extent of the scene. With a [[view]] to planting, they may be divided into three classes, which classes are independently altogether of the style in which they are laid out. The first class is ''the general or mingled [[flower garden|flower-garden]]'', in which is displayed a mixture of flowers with or without flowering-[[shrubs]] according to its size. The object in this class is to mix the plants, as that every part of the garden may present a gay assemblage of flowers of different colors during the whole season. The second class is ''the select [[flower garden|flower-garden]]'', in which the object is limited to the cultivation of particular kinds of plants; as, florists’ flowers, American plants, annuals, bulbs, &c. Sometimes two or more classes are included in one garden, as bulbs and annuals; but, in general, the best effect is produced by limiting the object to one class only. The third class is ''the changeable [[flower garden]]'', in which all the plants are kept in [[pot]]s, and reared in a flower-[[nursery]] or reserve-ground. As soon as they begin to flower, they are plunged in the [[border]]s of the [[flower garden|flower-garden]], and, whenever they show symptoms of decay, removed, to be replaced by others from the same source. This is obviously the most complete mode of any for a display of flowers, as the beauties of both the ''general'' and ''particular'' gardens may be combined without presenting blanks, or losing the fine effect of assemblages of varieties of the same species; as of hyacinth, pink, dahlia, chrysanthemum, &c. The fourth class is ''the [[botanic garden|botanic]] [[flower garden|flower-garden]]'', in which the plants are arranged with reference to botanical study, or at least not in any way that has for its main object a rich display of blossoms. . . .
[[File:1352.jpg|thumb|Fig. 34, J. C. Loudon, Plan of botanic flower garden with a circular walk, in ''An Encyclopaedia of Gardening'' (1826), p. 801, fig. 553.]]
:"6126. ''The [[botanical garden|botanic]] [[flower garden|flower-garden]]'' being intended to display something of the extent and variety of the vegetable kingdom, as well as its resemblances and differences, should obviously be arranged according to some system or method of study. In modern times, the choice is almost limited to the artificial system of Linnaeus, and the natural method of Jussieu, though Adanson has given above fifty-six different methods by which plants may be arranged. . . . Whatever method is adopted, the plants may either be placed in regular rows, or each order may be grouped apart, and surrounded by turf or gravel. For a private [[botanic garden]], the mode of grouping on turf is much the most elegant. . . .A gravel walk may be so contrived as to form a tour of all the groups [of species] (''fig.'' 553.), displaying them on both sides; in the centre, or in any fitting part of the scene, the botanic [[hothouse|hot-houses]] may be placed; and the whole might be surrounded with a sloping phalanx of evergreen plants, [[shrubs]], and trees. . . . It is hardly necessary to observe that the above modes, or others that we have mentioned of planting a [[flower garden|flower-garden]] are alike applicable to every form or style of laying out the garden or [[parterre]]. . . . [Fig. 34]
:"6127. ''Decorations''. Even the [[beehive|apiary]] and [[aviary]], or, at least, here and there a [[beehive]], or a cage suspended from a tree, will form very appropriate ornaments."
* Part III, Book II, Chapter III (pp. 802–803)
:"6130. ''By a [[shrubbery]], or [[shrub]]-garden'', we understand a scene for the display of [[shrubs]] valued for their beauty or fragrance, combining such trees as are considered chiefly ornamental, and some herbaceous flowers. The form or plan of the modern [[shrubbery]] is generally a winding [[border]], or strip of irregular width, accompanied by a [[walk]], near to which it commences with the herbaceous plants and lowest [[shrubs]], and as it falls back, the [[shrubs]] rise in gradation and terminate in the ornamental trees, also similarly graduated. Sometimes a [[border]] of [[shrubbery]] accompanies the [[walk]] on both sides; at other times only one side, while the other side is, in some cases, a [[border]] for culinary vegetables surrounding the [[kitchen garden|kitchen-garden]], but most generally it is an accompanying breadth of turf, varied by occasional groups of trees and plants, or decorations, and with the [[border]], forms what is called [[pleasure ground|pleasure-ground]].
:"6131. ''The sort of [[shrubbery]] formed under the [[geometric style]] of gardening'' . . . was more compact; it was called a ''bosque'', [[thicket]] or [[wood]], and contained various compartments of turf or gravel branching from the [[walk]]s, and very generally a [[labyrinth]]. The species of [[shrubs]] in those times being very limited, the object was more [[walk]]s for recreation, shelter, shade, and verdure, than a display of flowering [[shrub]]s. . . .
:"6132. ''In respect to situation'', it is essential that the [[shrubbery]] should commence either immediately at the house, or be joined to it by the [[flower garden|flower-garden]]; a secondary requisite is, that however far, or in whatever direction it be continued, the [[walk]] be so contrived as to prevent the necessity of going to and returning from the principal points to which it leads over the same ground."
* Part III, Book II, Chapter IV (pp. 804, 806, 807, 809, 810)
:"6138. ''On planting the [[shrubbery]]'' the same general remarks, submitted as introductory to ''planting the [[flower garden|flower-garden]]'', are applicable; and shrubs may be arranged in as many different manners as flowers. Trees, however, are permanent and conspicuous objects, and consequently produce an effect during winter, when the greater number of herbaceous plants are scarcely visible. This is more especially the case with that class called evergreens, which, according as they are employed or omitted, produce the greatest difference in the winter aspect of the [[shrubbery]]. We shall here describe four leading modes for the arrangement of the [[shrubbery]], distinguishing them by the names of the mingled or common, the select or grouped manner, and the systematic or methodical style of planting. Before proceeding farther it is requisite to observe, that the proportion of evergreen trees to deciduous trees in cultivation in this country, is as 1 to 12; of evergreen [[shrubs]] to deciduous shrubs, exclusive of climbers and creepers but including roses, as 4 to 8; that the time of the flowering of trees and [[shrubs]] is from March to August inclusive, and that the colors of the flowers are the same as in herbaceous plants. These data will serve as guides for the selection of species and varieties for the different modes of arrangement, but more especially for the mingled manner. . . .
[[File:1353.jpg|thumb|Fig. 35, J. C. Loudon, "The select or grouped manner of planting a shrubbery," in ''An Encyclopaedia of Gardening'' (1826), p. 806, fig. 559.]]
:"6141. ''The select or grouped manner'' of planting a [[shrubbery]] (''fig''. 559.) is analogous to the select manner of planting a [[flower garden|flower-garden]]. Here one genus, species, or even variety, is planted by itself in considerable numbers, so as to produce a powerful effect. Thus the pine tribe, as trees, may be alone planted in one part of the [[shrubbery]], and the holly, in its numerous varieties, as [[shrubs]]. After an extent of several yards, or hundreds of yards, have been occupied with these two genera, a third and fourth, say the evergreen fir tribe and the yew, may succeed, being gradually blended with them, and so on. A similar grouping is observed in the herbaceous plants inserted in the front of the [[plantation]]; and the arrangement of the whole as to height, is the same as in the mingled [[shrubbery]]. . . .[Fig. 35]
[[File:1847.jpg|thumb|Fig. 36, J. C. Loudon, Ground-plan for "systematic or methodical planting in shrubberies," in ''An Encyclopaedia of Gardening'' (1826), p. 807, fig. 560.]]
:"6973. ''[[nursery|Nurseries]] for rearing trees'' are commonly left to commercial gardeners, as the [[plantation]]s of few private landowners are so extensive, or continued through a sufficient number of years to render it worth their while to originate and nurse up their own tree and [[hedge]] plants. Exceptions, however, occur in the case of remote situations, and where there are tracts so extensive as to require many years in planting. . . .
:"6982. ''The principal objects of culture'' in a private tree-[[nursery]] are the hardy trees and [[shrubs]] of the country, which produce seeds; and the great object of the private [[nursery]]-gardener must be to collect or procure these seeds, prepare them for sowing, sow them in their proper seasons, and transplant and nurse them till fit for final planting."
:"7257. ''The breadth of [[terrace]]s'', and their height relatively to the level of the floor of the living-rooms, must depend jointly on the height of the floor of the living-rooms and the surface of the grounds or country to be seen over them. Too broad or too high a [[terrace]] will both have the effect of foreshortening a [[lawn]] with a declining surface, or concealing a near valley. The safest mode in doubtful cases is, not to form this appendage till after the principal floor is laid, and then to determine the details of the [[terrace]] by trial and correction.
:"7258. ''Narrow [[terrace]]s'' are entirely occupied as [[promenade]]s, and may be either gravelled or paved: and different levels, when they exist, connected by inclined planes or flights of steps. Where the breadth is more than is requisite for [[walk]]s, the borders may be kept in turf with groups or marginal strips of flowers and low [[shrubs]]. In some cases, the [[terrace]]-walls may be so extended as to enclose ground sufficient for a level [[plot]] to be used as a [[bowling green|bowling-green]] or a [[flower garden|flower-garden]]. These are generally connected with one of the living-rooms or the [[conservatory]], and to the latter is frequently joined an [[aviary]] and the entire range of botanic stoves. Or, the [[aviary]] may be made an elegant detached building, so placed as to group with the house and other surrounding objects. An elegant structure of this sort (''fig''. 718.) was designed by Repton for the grounds of the Pavilion at Brighton. . . .[Fig. 54]
:"7259. The [[flower garden|flower-garden]] should join both the [[conservatory]] and [[terrace]]; and, where the botanic stoves do not join the [[conservatory]] and the house, they, and also the [[aviary]] and other appropriate buildings and decorations, should be placed here.
* Part III, Book IV, Chapter IV (pp. 1023, 1028, 1029–1030, 1033–1034)
:"7280. ''The [[ferme ornée]]'' differs from a common farm in having a better dwelling-house, neater approach, and one partly or entirely distinct from that which leads to the offices. It also differs as to the [[hedge]]s, which are allowed to grow wild and irregular (''fig''. 722.), and are bordered on each side by a broad green [[drive]], and sometimes by a gravel-[[walk]] and [[shrubs]]. It differs from a villa farm in having no [[park]]. . . .[Fig. 56]
:"7313. ''Public [[park]]s, or equestrian [[promenade]]s'', are valuable appendages to large cities. Extent and a free air are the principle requisites, and the roads should be arranged so as to produce few intersections; but at the same time so as carriages may make either the tour of the whole scene, or adopt a shorter tour at pleasure. In the course of long roads, there ought to be occasional bays or side expansions to admit of carriages separating from the course, halting or turning. Where such [[promenade]]s are very extensive, they are furnished with places of accommodation and refreshment, both for men and horses; this is a valued part of their arrangement for occasional visitors from a distance, or in hired vehicles. . . .
[[File:1760.jpg|thumb|Fig. 60, J. C. Loudon, "Trees...arranged in the gardenesque manner," in ''The Suburban Gardener'' (1838), p. 165, fig. 47.]]
:"''[[Gardenesque]] Imitation''. Where the [[gardenesque]] style of imitating nature is to be employed, the trees, [[shrubs]], and herbaceous plants must be separated; and, instead of being grouped together as in forest scenery (where two trees, or a tree and a shrub, often appear to spring from the same root, and this root is accompanied by large rampant herbs), every [[gardenesque]] group must consist of trees which do not touch each other, and which only become groups by being as near together as is practicable without touching, and by being apart from larger masses, or from single trees or rows of trees. It is not meant by this, that in the [[gardenesque]] style the trees composing a group should all be equally distant from one another; for in that case they would not form a whole, which the word group always implies. On the contrary, though all the trees in a [[gardenesque]] group ought to be so far separated from each other as not to touch, yet the degrees of separation may be as different as the designer chooses, provided the idea of a group is not lost sight of.
[[File:1761.jpg|thumb|Fig. 61, J. C. Loudon, Trees arranged in the picturesque style, in ''The Suburban Gardener'' (1838), p. 165, fig. 48.]]
:"In ''fig''. 47, the trees are arranged in the [[gardenesque]] manner; and in ''fig''. 48, in the picturesque style. The same character is also communicated to the [[walk]]s; that in the [[gardenesque]] style having the margins definite and smooth, while the [[picturesque]] [[walk]] has the edge indefinite and rough. Utility requires that the gravel, in both styles of [[walk]], should be smooth, firm, and dry; for it must always be borne in mind, that, as [[landscape gardening|landscape-gardening]] is a useful as well as an agreeable art, no beauty must ever be allowed to interfere with the former quality. [Figs. 60 and 61]
:"In laying out grounds, or in criticising such as are already formed by eminent artists, it is necessary always to bear in mind the difference between the [[gardenesque]] and the [[picturesque]]; that is, between a [[plantation]] made merely for [[picturesque]] effect, and another made for [[gardenesque]] effect. [[Gardenesque]] effect in [[plantation]]s is far too little attended to for the beauty of the trees and [[shrubs]], whether individually or collectively; and [[picturesque]] effect is not generally understood by gardeners: so that the scenery of suburban residences is often neutralised in character by the ignorance of professional landscape-gardeners of the [[gardenesque]], and of professional horticulturists and nurserymen of the [[picturesque]]. To make the most of any place however small, all the styles of art ought to be familiar to the artist; because there are few places in which, though one style prevails, some traits of other styles may not be advantageously introduced.
:"In planting, thinning, and pruning, in order to produce [[gardenesque]] effect, the beauty of every individual tree and shrub, as a single object, is to be taken into consideration, as well as the beauty of the mass: while in planting, thinning, and pruning for [[picturesque]] effect, the beauty of individual trees and [[shrubs]] is of little consequence; because no tree or shrub, in [[picturesque]] [[plantation]] or scene, should stand isolated, and each should be considered as merely forming part of a group or mass. In a [[picturesque]] imitation of nature, the trees and shrubs, when planted, should be scattered over the ground in the most irregular manner; both in their disposition with reference to their immediate effect as plants, and with reference to their future effect as trees and shrubs. In some places trees should prevail, in others shrubs; in some parts the [[plantation]] should be thick, in others it should be thin; two or three trees, or a tree and shrub, ought often to be planted in one hole, and this more especially on [[lawn]]s. Where, on the contrary, trees and shrubs are to be scattered in the [[gardenesque]] manner, every one should stand singly; as in the [[geometric style|geometrical manner]] they should stand in regular lines, or in some regular figure. In the [[gardenesque]], there may be single trees and single shrubs; but there can be no such thing as a single tree in the [[picturesque]]. Every tree, in the [[picturesque]] style of laying out grounds, must always be grouped with something else, if it should be merely a shrub, a twiner, or a tuft of grass or other plants at its root. In the [[gardenesque]], the beauty of the tree consists in its own individual perfections, which are fully developed in consequence of the isolated manner in which it has been grown; in the picturesque, the beauty of a tree or shrub, as of every other object in the landscape, consists in its fitness to group with other objects. Now, the fitness of one object to group with another evidently does not consist in the perfection of the form of that object, but rather in that imperfection which requires another object to render it complete.
:"''In [[rustic style|Rustic]], Indigenous, or Fac-simile Imitations of Natural Scenery''. . . . Such scenes differ from those of the [[geometric style]], and also from those of artistical imitation, in this, that the same person who contrives them must also execute them. They can have no merit in design, and only mechanical merit in the execution. They scarcely require the aid of either a professional landscape-gardener, or a professional horticulturist; but, at the same time, they could not be executed by every common labourer. The imitation of such scenes must be made by a sort of self-taught artist, or a regularly instructed artist who will condescend to accept of this kind of employment. . . .
:"856. ''Public Gardens''. . . .
:"''At New York''. . . . St. John’s [[Park]] is of considerable extent, and has lately been thrown open to the inhabitants: it is tastefully and very judiciously planted, with the ornamental trees and [[shrubs]] indigenous to the country. (''Gard. Mag''., vol. iii. p. 347.). . . .
:"''Hoboken'', on the North River, about three miles from New York, is a public [[walk]] of great beauty and attraction. . . . Through this beautiful little [[wood]], a broad well-gravelled [[terrace]] is led by every point which can exhibit the scenery to advantage; narrower and wilder paths diverge at intervals, some into the deeper shadow of the [[woods]], and some shelving gradually to the pretty coves below. . . . (''D. M., &c.'', vol. ii. p. 170)
:"''A public [[cemetery]]'' was formed in 1831 at Mount Auburn, about three miles from Boston, and is easily approached either by the road, or the river which washes its borders. . . . 'This romantic and [[picturesque]] [[cemetery]],' says Dr. [[James Mease|Mease]], 'is the fashionable place of interment with the people of Boston.' . . .
:"''[[cemetery|Cemeteries]] at Philadelphia''. '[[Laurel Hill]] is about three miles and a half north of the city, on the river Schuylkill. The part devoted to interments embraces about twenty acres, and is laid out in the most tasteful manner. The entrance is a specimen of Doric architecture, through which is a pleasing [[vista]], and on each side are lodges for the accommodation of the gravedigger and gardener; and within is a neat cottage for the superintendent, a Gothic chapel for funeral service, a large dwelling-house for visiters [''sic''], a handsome receiving tomb, stabling for forty carriages, and a [[greenhouse]]. Besides the native forest trees on the place, several hundred more, and many ornamental [[shrubs]], have been planted. The lots are enclosed by iron railings.' . . . (''Dr. Mease in the Gard. Mag''., for 1843, p. 666.) . . .
:"''The [[cemetery]] of the Episcopal church of the town of Guildford'' is in a public [[square]], and uninclosed. The graves are, therefore, trampled upon, and the monuments injured, both by men and cattle. . . .

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