* Johnson, George William, 1847, ''A Dictionary of Modern Gardening'' (p. 418) <ref>George William Johnson, ''A Dictionary of Modern Gardening'', ed. by David Landreth (Philadelphia: Lea and Blanchard, 1847), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/D6PQSNAN view on Zotero].</ref>
: “'''PARK''', in the modern acceptation of the word, is an extensive adorned inclosure surround.ing surrounding the house and gardens, and affording pasturage either to '''deer''' or cattle. In Great Britain, a '''park''', strictly and legally, is a large extent of a man’s own ground inclosed and privileged for wild beasts of chase by prescription or by royal grant. (''Coke’s Litt''. 233. a. ''Blackstone'', 2. 38.) . . . It has been decided by the superior courts of law, that to constitute a '''park''' these circumstances are essential:—1. A grant from the king, or prescription. 2. That it be inclosed by a wall, pale, or hedge. 3. That it contain beasts of '''park''', and if it fail in any one of these, it is a total disparking. (''Croke Car. 59.'') Of such '''parks''' there are said to be 781 in England. (''Brooks Abr. Action sur Stat. 48.'')”
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