*“[[clump|CLUMP]]1828, ''n''. [Ger. ''klump''; D. ''klomp''; Sw. ''klimp''; Dan. ''klump'', a ''lump''; W. ''clamp''. It is ''lump'' with a prefix. It coincides with ''plump'', and L. ''plumbum'', lead; as An American Dictionary of the D. English Language''lood'', G. ''loth'', Dan. ''lod''., Eng. ''lead'', coincide with ''clod''. It signifies a mass or collection. . (1:n. p.])
:“1"[[clump|CLUMP]], ''n''. [Ger. ''klump''; D. A thick''klomp''; Sw. ''klimp''; Dan. ''klump'', short piece of wooda ''lump''; W. ''clamp''. It is ''lump'' with a prefix. It coincides with ''plump'', and L. ''plumbum'', or other solid substancelead; a shapeless massas the D. ''lood'', G. ''loth'', Dan. ''lod''., Eng. Hence ''clumperlead'', coincide with ''clod''. It signifies a clot mass or clodcollection. . . .]
:“2"1. A cluster thick, short piece of trees wood, or [[shrubs]]other solid substance; formerly written a shapeless mass. Hence ''plumpclumper''. In some parts of England, it is an adjective signifying lazy, unhandy. ''Baileya clot or clod.''”
:"2. A cluster of trees or shrubs; formerly written ''plump''. In some parts of England, it is an adjective signifying lazy, unhandy. ''Bailey.''"
*“[[column|COL’UMN]], ''n. col’um.'' [L. ''columna, columen''; W. ''colov'', a stalk or stem, a prop; ''colovyn'', Arm. ''coulouenn''; Fr. ''colonne''; It. ''colonna''; Sp. ''columna''; Port. ''columna'' or ''coluna''. This word is from the Celtic, signifying the stem of a tree, such stems being the first [[column]]s used. The primary sense is a shoot, or that which is set.]
:“1. In ''architecture'', a long round body of wood or stone, used to support or adorn a building, composed of a base*1828, a shaft and a capital. The shaft tapers from the base, in imitation of the stem of a tree. There are five kinds or orders of [[column]]s. 1. The Tuscan, rude, simple and massy; the highth [''sic''] An American Dictionary of which is fourteen semidiameters or modules, and the diminution at the top from one sixth to one eighth of inferior diameter. 2. The Doric, which is next in strength to the Tuscan, has a robust, masculine aspect; its highth [English Language''sic''] is sixteen modules. 3. The Ionic is more slender than the Tuscan and Doric; its highth [''sic''] is eighteen modules. 4. The Corinthian is more delicate in its form and proportions, and enriched with ornaments; its highth [''sic''] should be twenty modules(1:n. 5p. The Composite is a species of the Corinthian, and of the same highth [''sic'']. ''Encyc.'')
:“In strictness, the shaft of a "[[column|COL’UMN]] consists of one entire piece; but it is often composed of different pieces, so united''n. col’um.'' [L. ''columna, as to have the appearance of one entire piececolumen''; W. It differs in this respect from a ''[[pillar]]colov'', which primarily signifies a stalk or stem, a prop; ''pilecolovyn'', composed of small piecesArm. ''coulouenn''; Fr. ''colonne''; It. ''colonna''; Sp. ''columna''; Port. ''columna'' or ''coluna''. But This word is from the Celtic, signifying the two things are unfortunately confounded; and stem of a tree, such stems being the first [[column]] consisting of a single piece of timber s used. The primary sense is absurdly called a ''[[pillar]]'' shoot, or pilethat which is set.]
:“2"1. An erect In ''architecture'', a long round body of wood or elevated structure resembling stone, used to support or adorn a building, composed of a base, a shaft and a capital. The shaft tapers from the base, in imitation of the stem of a tree. There are five kinds or orders of [[column]] in architectures. 1. The Tuscan, rude, simple and massy; as the highth [''astronomical [[column]]sic'' ] of which is fourteen semidiameters or modules, and the diminution at Paristhe top from one sixth to one eighth of inferior diameter. 2. The Doric, a kind of hollow tower with a spiral ascent which is next in strength to the topTuscan, has a robust, masculine aspect; its highth [''gnomonic [[column]]sic'', a cylinder on which the hour of the day ] is sixteen modules. 3. The Ionic is indicated by more slender than the shadow of a styleTuscan and Doric; its highth [''military sic''] is eighteen modules. 4. The Corinthian is more delicate in its form and proportions, and enriched with ornaments; its highth [[column]]''sic''] should be twenty modules. 5. The Composite is a species of the Corinthian, among and of the Romans; same highth [''sic''triumphal [[column]]. ''; &cEncyc.''
:"In strictness, the shaft of a [[column]] consists of one entire piece; but it is often composed of different pieces, so united, as to have the appearance of one entire piece. It differs in this respect from a ''[[pillar]]'', which primarily signifies a ''pile'', composed of small pieces. But the two things are unfortunately confounded; and a [[column]] consisting of a single piece of timber is absurdly called a ''[[pillar]]'' or pile.
*“COP’PICE, :"2. An erect or elevated structure resembling a [[column]] in architecture; as the ''astronomical [[copse|COPSEcolumn]]'' at Paris, a kind of hollow tower with a spiral ascent to the top; ''ngnomonic [[column]]''. [Norm. , a cylinder on which the hour of the day is indicated by the shadow of a style; ''coupizmilitary [[column]]'', from among the Romans; ''coupertriumphal [[column]]'', to cut, Gr. . . ; &c.]"
:“A [[wood]] of small growth, or consisting of underwood or brushwood; a [[wood]] cut at certain times for fuel.”
*1828, ''An American Dictionary of the English Language'' (1:n.p.)
*“:"COP'PICE, [[Dovecotecopse|DOVE-COTCOPSE]], ''n''. A small building or box in which domestic pigeons breed[Norm. ''coupiz'', from ''couper'', to cut, Gr. . . .]
:"A [[Dovecote|DOVE-HOUSEwood]]of small growth, ''n''. A house or shelter consisting of underwood or brushwood; a [[wood]] cut at certain times for doves. . . fuel."
:“PIG’EON, ''n''. . . .
:“The domestic pigeon breeds in a box*1828, often attached to a building, called a ''[[dovecote|dovecot]]'' or ''[[pigeon house|pigeon-house]]An American Dictionary of the English Language''(1:n. The wild pigeon builds a nest on a tree in the forestp.)
:"[[Dovecote|DOVE-COT]], ''n''. A small building or box in which domestic pigeons breed. . . .
*“:"[[edgingDovecote|EDG’INGDOVE-HOUSE]], ''n''. That which is added on the [[border]], A house or which forms the edge; as lace, fringe, trimming, added to a garment shelter for ornamentdoves. . . .
:“2"PIG'EON, ''n''. . . A narrow lace.
:“3. In ''gardening''"The domestic pigeon breeds in a box, often attached to a row of small plants set alongbuilding, the border of called a flower-bed; as an ''[[edgingdovecote|dovecot]]'' of box. or ''Encyc[[pigeon house|pigeon-house]]''.The wild pigeon builds a nest on a tree in the forest."
*“[[eminence|EM’INENCE]], EM’INENCY1828, ''nAn American Dictionary of the English Language''(1:n. [L. ''eminentia'', from ''eminens, emineo'', to stand or show itself above; ''e'' and ''minor'', to threaten, that is, to stand or push forward. . . p.])
:“1. Elevation"[[edging|EDG’ING]], highth [''sicn''. That which is added on the [[border]], in a literal senseor which forms the edge; but usuallyas lace, fringe, trimming, added to a rising ground; a hill of moderate elevation above the adjacent groundgarment for ornament. . . .
:“The [[temple]] of honor ought to be seated on an ''[[eminence]]''"2. ''Burke''A narrow lace.
:"3. In ''gardening'', a row of small plants set along, the border of a flower-bed; as an ''[[edging]]'' of box. ''Encyc''."
*"FISH-[[pond|POND]], ''n''. A [[pond]] in which fishes are bred and kept."
*1828, ''An American Dictionary of the English Language'' (1:n.p.)
*“FOUNT’, :"[[fountaineminence|FOUNT’AINEM'INENCE]], EM'INENCY, ''n''. [L. ''fonseminentia''; Fr. ''fontaine''; Sp. ''fuente, from ''eminens, It. emineo''fonte, fontana''to stand or show itself above; W. ''fynnone'', a [[fountain]] or source; and ''fyniaw, fynuminor'', to producethreaten, to generatethat is, to abound; ''fwn'', a source, breath, puff; ''fwnt'', producestand or push forward. . . .]
:“1"1. A springElevation, or source of water; properly, a spring or issuing of water from the earth. This word accords in sense with highth [''wellsic''], in our mother tonguea literal sense; but we now distinguish themusually, applying ''[[fountain]]'' to a natural spring of water, and ''well'' to an artificial pit of water, issuing from the interior rising ground; a hill of moderate elevation above the earthadjacent ground.
:“2. A small "The [[basintemple]] of springing waterhonor ought to be seated on an ''[[eminence]]''. ''TaylorBurke''."
:“3. A [[jet]]; a spouting of water; an artificial spring. ''Bacon''.
:“4. The head or source of a river. *1828, ''DrydenAn American Dictionary of the English Language''(1:n.p.)
:“5"FISH-[[pond|POND]], ''n''. Original; first principle or cause; the source of any thingA [[pond]] in which fishes are bred and kept."
*“[[gate|GATE]]1828, ''nAn American Dictionary of the English Language''(1:n. [Sax. ''gate, geat''; Ir. ''greata''; Scot. ''gait''; The Goth. ''gatwo'', Dan. ''gade'', Sw. ''gat''a, G. ''gasse'', Sans. ''gaut'', is a way or street. In D. ''gat'' is a gap or channel. . . p.])
:“1. A large door which gives entrance into a walled city, a castle"FOUNT’, a [[templefountain|FOUNT'AIN]], palace or other large edifice''n''. [L. ''fons''; Fr. ''fontaine''; Sp. ''fuente'', It differs from . ''doorfonte, fontana'' chiefly in being larger; W. ''fynnon'', a [[Gatefountain]]or source; ''fyniaw, fynu'' signifies both the opening or passage, and the frame of boardsto produce, to generate, to abound; ''fwn'', a source, breath, planks or timber which closes the passagepuff; ''fwnt'', produce.]
:“2"1. A frame spring, or source of timber which opens water; properly, a spring or closes issuing of water from the earth. This word accords in sense with ''well'', in our mother tongue; but we now distinguish them, applying ''[[fountain]]'' to a passage into any courtnatural spring of water, garden or other inclosed ground; alsoand ''well'' to an artificial pit of water, issuing from the interior of the passageearth.
:“3"2. The frame which shuts or stops the passage A small [[basin]] of springing water through a dam into a flume. ''Taylor''.
:“4"3. An A [[avenuejet]]; a spouting of water; an opening; a wayartificial spring. ''KnollesBacon''.
:"4. The head or source of a river. ''Dryden''.
*“[[green|GREEN]], ''n'':"5. The color Original; first principle or cause; the source of growing plants. . . any thing."
:“2. A grassy plain or [[plat]]; a piece of ground covered with verdant herbage.
:“O’er the smooth enameled *1828, ''[[green]]An American Dictionary of the English Language''(1:n. ''Milton''p.)
:"[[gate|GATE]], ''n''. [Sax. ''gate, geat''; Ir. ''greata''; Scot. ''gait''; The Goth. ''gatwo'', Dan. ''gade'', Sw. ''gat''a, G. ''gasse'', Sans. ''gaut'', is a way or street. In D. ''gat'' is a gap or channel. . . .]
*“GROT:"1. A large door which gives entrance into a walled city, a castle, a [[grotto|GROT’TOtemple]], ''n''. [Frpalace or other large edifice. It differs from ''grottedoor'', Itchiefly in being larger. ''grotta[[Gate]]''signifies both the opening or passage, Sp. and Portthe frame of boards, planks or timber which closes the passage. ''gruta''; G. and Dan. ''grotte''; D. ''grot''; Sax. ''grut''. ''Grotta'' is not used.]
:“1"2. A large cave frame of timber which opens or den; closes a subterraneous cavernpassage into any court, and primarilygarden or other inclosed ground; also, a natural cave or rent in the earth, or such as is formed by a current of water, or an earthquake. ''Pope. Prior. Drydenpassage.''
:“2"3. A cave for coolness and refreshmentThe frame which shuts or stops the passage of water through a dam into a flume.
:"4. An [[avenue]]; an opening; a way. ''Knolles''."
*“[[grove|GROVE]], ''n''. [Sax. ''groef, graf'', a ''grave'', a cave, a ''[[grove]]''; Goth. ''groba''; from cutting an [[avenue]], or from the resemblance of an [[avenue]] to a channel.]
:“1. In *1828, ''gardening'', a small [[wood]] or cluster An American Dictionary of trees with a shaded [[avenue]], or a [[wood]] impervious to the rays of the sun. A [[grove]] is either open or close; open, when consisting of large trees whose branches shade the ground below; close, when consisting of trees and underwood, which defend the [[avenue]]s from the rays of the sun and from violent winds. ''EncycEnglish Language''(1:n.p.)
:“2. A "[[woodgreen|GREEN]] , ''n''. The color of small extentgrowing plants. . . In America, the word is applied to a [[wood]] of natural growth in the field, as well as to planted trees in a garden, but only to a [[wood]] of small extent and not to a forest.
:"2. A grassy plain or [[plat]]; a piece of ground covered with verdant herbage.
*“:"O'er the smooth enameled ''[[hedge|HEDGEgreen]], ''n. hej.'' [Sax. ''hege, heag, hoeg, hegge''; G. ''heck'', D. ''heg, haag''; Dan. ''hekke'' or ''hek''; Sw. ''hagn'', hedge, protection; Fr. ''haie''; W. ''cae''. Hence Eng. ''haw'', and ''HagueMilton'' in Holland. . . .]"
:“Properly, a [[thicket]] of thorn-bushes or other [[shrubs]] or small trees; but appropriately, such a [[thicket]] planted round a field to [[fence]] it, or in rows, to separate the parts of a garden.”
*1828, ''An American Dictionary of the English Language'' (1:n.p.)
*“:"GROT, [[hermitagegrotto|HER’MITAGEGROT’TO]], ''n''. The habitation of a hermit; a house or hut with its appendages[Fr. ''grotte'', in a solitary placeIt. ''grotta'', where a hermit dwellsSp. and Port. ''Miltongruta''; G. and Dan.''grotte''; D. ''grot''; Sax. ''grut''. ''Grotta'' is not used.]
:“2"1. The cell A large cave or den; a subterraneous cavern, and primarily, a natural cave or rent in the earth, or such as is formed by a recluse placecurrent of water, but annexed to or an abbeyearthquake. ''EncycPope. Prior. Dryden.''.
:“3"2. A kind of winecave for coolness and refreshment."
*1828, ''An American Dictionary of the English Language'' (1:n.p.) :"[[grove|GROVE]], ''n''. [Sax. ''groef, graf'', a ''grave'', a cave, a ''[[grove]]''; Goth. ''groba''; from cutting an [[avenue]], or from the resemblance of an [[avenue]] to a channel.] :"1. In ''gardening'', a small [[wood]] or cluster of trees with a shaded [[avenue]], or a [[wood]] impervious to the rays of the sun. A [[grove]] is either open or close; open, when consisting of large trees whose branches shade the ground below; close, when consisting of trees and underwood, which defend the [[avenue]]s from the rays of the sun and from violent winds. ''Encyc''. :"2. A [[wood]] of small extent. In America, the word is applied to a [[wood]] of natural growth in the field, as well as to planted trees in a garden, but only to a [[wood]] of small extent and not to a forest.”  *1828, ''An American Dictionary of the English Language'' (1:n.p.) :"[[hedge|HEDGE]], ''n. hej.'' [Sax. ''hege, heag, hoeg, hegge''; G. ''heck'', D. ''heg, haag''; Dan. ''hekke'' or ''hek''; Sw. ''hagn'', hedge, protection; Fr. ''haie''; W. ''cae''. Hence Eng. ''haw'', and ''Hague'' in Holland. . . .] :"Properly, a [[thicket]] of thorn-bushes or other [[shrubs]] or small trees; but appropriately, such a [[thicket]] planted round a field to [[fence]] it, or in rows, to separate the parts of a garden."  *1828, ''An American Dictionary of the English Language'' (1:n.p.) :"[[hermitage|HER’MITAGE]], ''n''. The habitation of a hermit; a house or hut with its appendages, in a solitary place, where a hermit dwells. ''Milton''. :"2. The cell in a recluse place, but annexed to an abbey. ''Encyc''. :"3. A kind of wine."  *1828, ''An American Dictionary of the English Language'' (1:n.p.) :"[[icehouse|ICEHOUSE]], ''n''. [''ice'' and ''house''.] A repository for the preservation of ice during warm weather; a pit with a drain for conveying off the water of the ice when dissolved, and usually covered with a roof."

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