==History==
[[File:2010-detail2010_detail.jpg|thumb|right|252px|Fig. 1, Antoine de Sartine, comte d'Alby, ''Plan de la barre et du havre de Charles-Town d'après un plan anglois levé en 1776''[detail], (1778), detail.]]
Following a series of fiery sermons preached in her native Boston by the English evangelist George Whitefield (1714-1770), fourteen-year-old Elizabeth Pitts journeyed to Savannah, Georgia and entered Whitefield’s [[Bethesda Orphan House]] on December 13, 1740.<ref>George White, ''Historical Collections of Georgia: Containing the Most Interesting Facts, Traditions, Biographical Sketches, Anecdotes, Etc.'' (New York: Pudney & Russell, 1854), 335, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/P8GER2ZN view on Zotero].</ref> She was one of a handful of girls who were not orphans, but merely "poor," with one or more parent still living.<ref> White, 1854, 335, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/P8GER2ZN view on Zotero]. Significantly, Whitefield's Boston sermon of October 8, 1740 had instructed children, “If your parents will not come to Christ, you [should] come and go to heaven without them.” See Thomas S. Kidd, ''George Whitefield: America’s Spiritual Founding Father'' (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), 126, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/BGQW367X view on Zotero]. For the letter Elizabeth wrote to Whitefield describing herself as "the worst, the ungratefullest of all Sinners upon Earth," see Sarah Gober Temple and Kenneth L. Coleman, ''Georgia Journeys: Being an Account of the Lives of Georgia’s Original Settlers and Many Other Early Settlers'' (Athens, Ga.: University of Georgia Press, 2010), 233, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/FEGTP4P4 view on Zotero].</ref> At the [[Bethesda Orphan House]], she received instruction in religion, Latin, arithmetic, writing, and reading. She also learned household skills intended to make her “serviceable," such as sewing, spinning, and "housewifery."<ref>George Whitefield, “An Account of the Money Received and Disbursed for the Orphan House in Georgia” (December 23, 1740) in Eric McCoy North, ''Early Methodist Philanthropy'' (New York: The Author, 1914), 157, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/X6DK3MWE view on Zotero]; Lilla Mills Hawes, "A Description of Whitefield’s Bethesda: Samuel Fayrweather to Thomas Prince and Thomas Foxcroft," ''The Georgia Historical Quarterly'', 45 (December 1961): 366, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/X57X7QZ2 view on Zotero]; George Whitefield, ''The Works of the Reverend George Whitefield, M.A., ... to Which Is Prefixed, an Account of His Life, Compiled from His Original Papers and Letters'', 6 vols. (London: Edward and Charles Dilly, 1771), 3: 466, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/4R3DI39I view on Zotero]. See also Kidd, 2014, 118, 141, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/BGQW367X view on Zotero].</ref> The seeds of her later fascination with gardening may have been planted at Bethesda. According to the English writer Edward Kimber (1719-1769), who visited the [[Bethesda Orphan House]] in 1743, the girls' "vacant Hours were employ'd in Garden and [[Plantation]]-Work." Kimber described the garden as "a very extensive one, and well kept up, ...one of the best I ever saw in ''America''."<ref>The "Plantation-Work evidently included picking cotton. See Edward Kimber, ''Itinerant Observations in America'', ed. Kevin J. Hayes (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1998), 34, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/9GJAF44R view on Zotero].</ref> After leaving the orphanage in June 1742, Elizabeth probably went into service in Charleston.<ref>She is presumably the child Whitefield referenced in his "Continuation of the Account and Progress, &c. of the Orphan-House" (March 21, 1746): "One that I brought from ''New-England'' is handsomely settled in ''Carolina''"; see Whitefield, 1771, 3: 466, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/4R3DI39I view on Zotero]. She left Bethesda prior to the evacuation of the orphan home on July 10, 1742, when the children took refuge at the Charleston plantations of Jonathan Bryan (1708-1788), his brother Hugh (1699-1753), and their brother-in-law Stephen Bull (d.1770). See Whitefield, 1771, 3: 455-59, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/4R3DI39I view on Zotero]; Alan Gallay, ''The Formation of a Planter Elite: Jonathan Bryan and the Southern Colonial Frontier'' (Athens, Ga.: University of Georgia Press, 2007), 41, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/JTTIJZSK view on Zotero].</ref> There, on November 29, 1744, she married Thomas Lamboll, a wealthy, well-educated merchant whose second wife had died the previous year.<ref>Lamboll had married Mary Detmar (1710-September 15, 1743) on September 21, 1742. At the time of his marriage to Elizabeth Pitts, he had a three-year-old son by his first wife. See Alexander Samuel Salley, Jr., ''Register of St. Philip’s Parish Charles Town, South Carolina, 1720-1758'' (Charleston: Walker, Evans & Cogswell, 1904), 94, 177, 180, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/QP5VZSFS view on Zotero]; Mabel L. Webber, "Inscriptions from the Independent or Congregational (Circular) Church Yard Charleston, S. C. (Continued)," ''The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine'', 29 (April 1928): 143, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/HTEJK4ZF view on Zotero].</ref> Lamboll was a prominent public figure, having served for many years as justice of the peace and clerk of the Congregational Church.<ref>Walter B. Edgar and N. Louise Bailey, ''Biographical Directory of the South Carolina House of Representatives'', 5 vols. (Columbia, S.C.: University of South Carolina Press, 1977), 387-88, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/G89DVTV3 view on Zotero]; Elise Pinckney, ''Thomas and Elizabeth Lamboll: Early Charleston Gardeners'', Charleston Museum Leaflet, No. 28 (Charleston, S.C.: Charleston Museum, 1969), 4-9, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/DU97BPKV view on Zotero].</ref> He also owned extensive property in and around Charleston, including a rice [[plantation]] across the Ashley River on James Island, acquired by his father in 1696.<ref>John Bartram and Francis Harper, "Diary of a Journey through the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida from July 1, 1765, to April 10, 1766," ''Transactions of the American Philosophical Society'', 33 (December 1942): 57, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/NZ6AE93V view on Zotero]; Pinckney, 1969, 4, 6-7, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/DU97BPKV view on Zotero]; Preservation Consultants, Inc., ''James Island and Johns Island Historical Survey'' (Charleston, S.C.: South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Summer 1989), 8, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/9PKNXN2J view on Zotero].</ref> A French map of 1776 represents [[avenue]]s of trees leading to a two-story house on the property. [Fig. 1]

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