* [[Graydon, Alexander]], 1811, describing the garden of Israel Pemberton, Philadelphia, Pa. (pp. 34–35) <ref>Alexander Graydon, ''Memoirs of a Life Chiefly Passed in Pennsylvania within the Last Sixty Years'' (Harrisburg, Pa.: John Wyeth, 1811), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/SIZFRZVI/ view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“laid out in the old fashioned style of uniformity, with '''walks''' and allies nodding to their brothers, and decorated with a number of evergreens, carefully clipped into pyramidal and conical forms.”
* [[Gerry, Elbridge, Jr.]], July 1813, describing the White House, Washington, D.C. (1927: 180) <ref>Elbridge Gerry, Jr., ''The Diary of Elbridge Gerry, Jr.'' (New York: Brentano’s, 1927), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/8P4QSRIF view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“Lengthways of the house, and thro’ the hall, is a '''walk''', which extends on a [[terrace]] at each end for some way.”
* [[Ripley, Samuel]], 1815, describing Gore Place, summer home of Christopher and Rebecca Gore, Waltham, Mass. (pp. 272–73) <ref>Samuel Ripley, ‘A Topographical and Historical Description of Waltham, in the County of Middlesex, Jan. 1, 1815’, ''Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society'', 3 (January) (1815), 261–84, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/7INJ3GDV view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“The house is a spacious and noble building. . . . It is situated in the centre of pleasant grounds, tastefully laid out, surrounded by a '''walk''' of a mile in circuit, intersected by several other '''walks''', on all of which are growing trees and [[shrubbery]] of various kinds.”
* [[Lambert, John]], 1816, describing [[Vauxhall Garden]], New York, N.Y. (2:61) <ref name="Lambert">John Lambert, ''Travels through Canada, and the United States of North America in the Years 1806, 1807, and 1808'', 2 vols. (London: Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy, 1816), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/T9KUEDWH view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“The [[Vauxhall garden ]] is situated in the Bowery Road about two miles from the City Hall. It is a neat [[plantation]], with gravel '''walks''' adorned with shrubs, trees, busts, and [[statue]]s.”
* [[Lambert, John]], 1816, describing Savannah, Ga. (2:265–66) <ref name="Lambert"></ref>
:“This range of buildings extends nearly three quarters of a mile along the town; and opposite to it is a beautiful '''walk''' or [[mall]], planted with a double row of trees, the same as those at Charleston— (''Melia Azedarach'', or Pride of India). . . .
* [[Peale, Charles Willson]], 14 August 1816, in a letter to his son, Rembrandt Peale, describing his painting of [[Belfield]], estate of Charles Willson Peale, Germantown, Pa. (Miller, Hart, and Ward, eds., 1991: 3:435) <ref>Lillian B. Miller, et al, ''The Selected Papers of Charles Willson Peale and His Family: Charles Willson Peale: Artist in Revolutionary America, 1735-1791. Vol. 1; Charles Willson Peale, Artist as Museum Keeper, 1791-1810. Vol 2, Pts. 1-2; The Belfield Farm Years, 1810-1820. Vol. 3; The Autobiography of Charles Willson Peale. Vol. 5.'' (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1983–2000), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/IZAKPCBG view on Zotero.]</ref>
: “I have been so long neglecting the [[view]] I am about in the Garden that the Tree’s & Shrubery have grown so high that I cannot represent them truely without almost hiding the '''walks''', therefore I shall prefer leaving out many of them—and also make others smaller.”
* [[Latrobe, Benjamin Henry]], 20 February 1819, describing the [[Montgomery House]], New Orleans, La. (1951: 43–45) <ref>Benjamin Henry Latrobe, ''Impressions Respecting New Orleans: Diaries and Sketches, 1818-1820'', ed. by Samuel Wilson (New York: Columbia University Press, 1951),[https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/MJS5EE69/ view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“Close to the river, & separated only by the levee & road, is the old fashioned, but otherwise handsome, garden & house of Mr. Montgomery. The garden, which I think covers not less than 4 acres, is laid out in [[square]] '''walks''' & flower [[bed]]s in the old [[French style]]. It is entirely enclosed by a thick [[hedge]] of orange trees, which have been suffered to run up to 15 or 16 feet high on the flanks & rear, but which are shorn down to the highth [''sic''] of 4 or 5 feet along the road. The '''Walks''' are bordered by very large myrtles cut into the shape of large hay cocks, about 8 feet high & as much in diameter. There are so many of them, and they are so exactly equal in size & form that the effect is curious if not elegant.”
* [[Forman, Martha Ogle]], 13 June 1820, describing [[Rose Hill]], home of Martha Ogle Forman, Baltimore County, Md. (1976: 104) <ref>Martha Ogle Forman, ''Plantation Life at Rose Hill: The Diaries of Martha Ogle Forman, 1814-1845'' (Wilmington, Del.: Historical Society of Delaware, 1976), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/EHQ6UZGE view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“My husband had secretly, cut a long and beautiful shady '''walk''', by our spring along the margin of Forman’s Creek to the Irishmen’s dam. It was a most agreeable surprise and highly pleased all our company. The Ivy was in bloom on each side, the '''walk''', which with the Hemlock Spruce gave it a very pretty effect.”
* [[Bryant, William Cullen]], 25 August 1821, describing the [[Vale]], estate of Theodore Lyman, Waltham, Ma. (1975: 108–9) <ref>William Cullen Bryant, ''The Letters of William Cullen Bryant'', ed. by William Cullen II Bryant and Thomas G. Voss (New York: Fordham University Press, 1975), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/3X5XUJ6A view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“He took me to the [[seat]] of Mr. Lyman. . . . It is a perfect paradise. . . . A hard rolled '''walk''', by the side of a brick [[wall]] . . . led us to a [[grove]] of young forest trees on the top of [an] [[eminence]].”
* [[Columbian Institute]], 1823, describing the Columbian Institute, Washington, D.C. (quoted in O’Malley 1989: 127) <ref name="O'Malley 1989"></ref>
:“Four '''walks''' have been laid out, one on Pennsylvania Avenue, one on Maryland Avenue, one opposite the circular road around the west side of the Capitol, and one in the center of the ground leading to the [[pond]]. The three '''walks''' on the sides of the garden are 20 feet wide, with [[border]]s of 26 feet, in which to plant trees and shrubs; the center '''walk''' or road is 15 feet wide; the whole is well graveled.”
* Kremer, Eliza Vierling, 1824–29, describing the pleasure grounds at [[Salem Academy]], Salem, N.C. (quoted in Bynum 1979: 29) <ref>Flora Ann L. Bynum, ''Old Salem Garden Guide'' (Winston-Salem, N.C.: Old Salem, 1979), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/TJB9XNMF view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“A large garden, some little distance from the Academy, was during the Summer Season, a place for recreation after school hours. . . .
* Bacon, Edmund, c. 1825, describing [[Monticello]], plantation of Thomas Jefferson, Charlottesville, Va. (quoted in Adams 1976: 329) <ref>William Howard Adams, ''The Eye of Thomas Jefferson'' (Washington, D.C.: National Gallery of Art, 1976), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/IWQT8BPV/ view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“The grounds, around the house were most beautifully ornamented with flowers and [[shrubbery]]. There were '''walks''', and [[border]]s, and flowers, that I have never seen or heard of anywhere else. Some of them were in bloom from early in the spring until late in the winter. A good many of them were foreign. Back of the house was a beautiful [[lawn]] of two or three acres, where his grandchildren used to play a great deal.”
* [[Hunt, Henry, William Elliot]], and [[William Thornton]], 1826, describing a proposed memorial in Washington, D.C. (U.S. Congress, 19th Congress, 1st Session, House of Representatives, doc. 123, book 138)
:“Cool and shady '''walks''' will be formed in the neighborhood of the Capitol; the science of Botany encouraged; and a delightful scene from the Capitol created to please the eye of the stranger and citizen.”
* [[Trollope, Frances Milton]], 1830, describing Hudson Square, New York, N.Y. (1832: 2:160) <ref name="Trollope">Frances Trollope, ''Domestic Manners of the Americans'', 3rd edn, 2 vols. (London: Wittaker, Treacher, 1832), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/T5RXDF7G/ view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“it will give some idea of the care bestowed on its decoration, to know that the gravel for the '''walks''' was conveyed by barges from Boston, not as ballast, but as freight.”
* [[Trollope, Frances Milton]], 1830, describing Hoboken, N.J. (1832: 2:167) <ref name="Trollope"></ref>
:“A gentleman who possessed a handsome mansion and grounds there, also possessed the right of ferry, and to render this productive, he has restricted his [[pleasure ground]]s to a few beautiful acres, laying out the remainder simply and tastefully as a public '''walk'''. It is hardly possible to imagine one of greater attraction; a broad belt of light underwood and flowering shrubs, studded at intervals with lofty forest trees, runs for two miles along a cliff which overhangs the matchless Hudson.”
* [[Thacher, James]], 3 December 1830, describing [[Hyde Park]], seat of [[Dr. David Hosack]], on the Hudson River, N.Y. (''New England Farmer'' 9: 156)
:“From the house, gravelled '''walks''' diverge and extend in opposite directions nearly half a mile, exhibiting a diversified scenery of hills and dales, now descending a sloping declivity on the verge of a precipice, again ascending to a commanding plain, opening a scene of unrivalled beauty.”
* [[Ingraham, Joseph Holt]], 1835, describing New Orleans, La. (1:88) <ref>Joseph Holt Ingraham, ''The South-West'', 2 vols. (New York: Harper, 1835), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/DTFA8CCM view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“On a firm, smooth, gravelled '''walk''' elevated about four feet, by a gradual ascent from the street—one side open to the river, and the other lined with the ‘Pride of China,’ or India tree, we pursued our way to Chartres-street, the ‘Broadway’ of New-Orleans.”
:“There is one thing about the improvements in New York I very much like, and which, as you are a man of influence, I hope you will endeavor to impress on the Bostonians;—the disposition to ornament the streets with rows of trees, thus giving to them an air of freshness and beauty very much wanting in our large cities and in country towns, for nothing adds more to beauty than rows of trees along the public '''walks''', which may be placed there for a trifling expense.
<p></p>
:“The [[BatteryPark|Battery]], St. John’s Park, [[Washington Square]], and many other public '''walks''' exhibit the taste of the New Yorkers in this respect, and their practice of making every open and beautiful piece of ground an object of ornament to the city, and a pleasant resort for the inhabitants, is worthy of observation.”
* [[Alcott, William A.]], 1838, “Embellishment and Improvement of Towns and Villages” (''American Annals of Education'' 8: 337–38)
:“Of our larger cities, even Philadelphia and Boston, we do not hesitate to say that almost every thing, in their structure and condition, is at war with the highest physical and moral well being of their inhabitants. We do not indeed forget their beautiful [[common]]s and [[square]]s and public '''walks'''; but it is impossible for us to believe that a few of these will ever atone for that neglect whose effects stare us in the face, not merely in passing through dirty and filthy [[avenue]]s, but in traversing almost every street, and in turning almost every corner. A single [[common]], beautiful though it may be, as any spot on the earth’s surface, and refreshed though it were by the balmy breezes which ‘blow soft o’er Ceylon’s isle;’ or a few public [[square]]s, remembrances though they be of him whose praises will never cease to be celebrated while the ‘city of brotherly love’ shall remain, will yet never purify the crowded, unventilated cellars and shops—and dwellings, too—of a hundred or a thousand thickly congregated streets. . . .”
* [[Adams, Rev. Nehemiah]], 1838, describing Portland, Maine ([Adams] 1838: 31) <ref>Nehemiah Adams, ''The Boston Common, or Rural Walks in Cities'' (Boston: George W. Light, 1838), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/E29QRTC3 view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“An equally striking indication of the spirit of improvement peculiar to these times is the public '''walk''' recently laid out in Portland. This '''walk''', consisting of a carriage and foot way, shaded with trees, is nearly two miles in length, extending in an oval form around a hill, on which is the telegraph [[observatory]], and commanding a [[view]] of the adjacent scenery, which may be classed among the best in the country.”
* [[Hovey, C. M.]], November 1839, “Notices of Gardens and Horticulture, in Salem, Mass,” describing Elfin Glen, residence of P. Dodge, Salem, Mass. (''Magazine of Horticulture'' 5: 404)
:“The cottage stands near the road, and is entered from the west front; on the south end is a [[piazza]]; the drawing-room opens into this, and thence into the garden to an open space, answering somewhat the purpose of a [[terrace]], neatly gravelled; a '''walk''' from thence conducts directly, in a straight line, nearly to the edge of the river, where it terminates in a rustic [[arch]] and [[vase]] on the [[lawn]]; on each side of the '''walk''' there is turf, with circles of flowers at the distance of ten or twelve feet; these are each backed by a line of buckthorn [[hedge]]s, with a [[view]] to screen both the fruit garden on the east, and the vegetable garden on the west, from sight.”
* [[Willis, Nathaniel Parker]], 1840, describing Saratoga, N.Y. (quoted in Deák 1988: 1:424) <ref name="Deák"></ref>
:“When the gentleman has swallowed his muriate and four carbonates in proper quantity, a smooth serpentine '''walk''' leads to the summit of a prettily wooded hill, where he may either grind himself round a circular rail-road in a self-moving chair, or ramble off to the shade, for a little meditation.”
* [[Willis, Nathaniel Parker]], 1840, describing the [[Fairmount Waterworks]], Philadelphia, Pa. ([1840] 1971: 313) <ref>Nathaniel Parker Willis, ''American Scenery, or Land, Lake and River Illustrations of Transatlantic Nature'', 2 vols. (Barre, Mass.: Imprint Society, 1971), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/T5CMW67U view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“Steps and [[terrace]]s conduct to the reservoirs, and thence the [[view]] over the ornamented grounds of the country [[seat]]s opposite, and of a very [[picturesque]] and uneven country beyond, is exceedingly attractive. Below, the court of the principal building is laid out with gravel '''walks''', and ornamented with [[fountain]]s and flowering trees; and within the edifice there is a public drawing-room, of neat design and furniture; while in another wing are elegant refreshment-rooms—and, in short, all the appliances and means of a place of public amusement.”
* [[Buckingham, James Silk]], 1841, describing New York, N.Y. (1:38–39) <ref name="Buckingham">James Silk Buckingham, ''America, Historical, Statistic, and Descriptive'', 2 vols. (New York: Harper, 1841), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/PIANFMVK view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“Of the public places for air and exercise with which the Continental cities of Europe are so abundantly and agreeably furnished, and which London, Bath, and some other of the larger cities of England contain, there is a marked deficiency in New-York. Except the [[BatteryPark|Battery]], which is agreeable only in summer—the [[Bowling Green]] is a confined space of 200 feet long by 150 broad; the [[Park]], which is a comparatively small spot of land (about ten acres only) in the heart of the city, and quite a public thoroughfare; Hudson Square, the prettiest of the whole, but small, being only about four acres; and the open space within Washington Square, about nine acres, which is not yet furnished with gravel-'''walks''' or shady trees—there is no large place in the nature of a [[park]], or [[public garden]], or public '''walk''', where persons of all classes may take air and exercise. This is a defect which, it is hoped, will ere long be remedied, as there is no country, perhaps, in which it would be more advantageous to the health and pleasure of the community than this to encourage, by every possible means, the use of air and exercise to a much greater extent than either is at present enjoyed.”
* [[Buckingham, J. S.James Silk]], 1841, describing Rochester, N.Y. (2:215) <ref name="Buckingham"></ref>
:“A large piece of ground immediately overlooking the principal Falls of the Genesee, and called the Falls Promenade, is about to be laid out as a public '''walk''' and garden, and will be a fine ornament to the town.”
* [[Hovey, C. M.]], September 1841, describing the residence of R. F. Carman, Fort Washington, N.Y. (''Magazine of Horticulture'' 7: 326)
:“The [[flower garden]] is laid out in angular shaped [[bed]]s of small size, occupying a [[square]] of about one hundred feet, with the '''walks''' edged with box. The only fault we have to find with the plan is the narrowness of the '''walks''', not being above two feet wide, and, consequently, not allowing two to '''walk''' abreast. The same error we saw committed at other places. It should be laid down as a rule, never to make the '''walks''' less than three feet wide, and if three and a half, it will be better.”
* [[Dickens, Charles]], 1842, describing the [[White House]], Washington, D.C. (pp. 153–54) <ref>Charles Dickens, ''American Notes'' (Paris: Baudry’s European Library, 1842), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/TTQMJ9AD view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“The President’s mansion is more like an English club-house, both within and without, than any other kind of establishment with which I can compare it. The ornamental ground about it has been laid out in garden '''walks'''; they are pretty, and agreeable to the eye; though they have that uncomfortable air of having been made yesterday, which is far from favourable to the display of such beauties.”
* [[Kirkbride, Thomas S.]], 1844, describing the [[Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane]], Philadelphia, Pa. (1851: 24) <ref>
Thomas Story Kirkbride, ''Reports of the Pennsylvania Hospital for The Insane: For the Years 1846-7-8-9 and 50'' (Philadelphia: Published by order of the Board of Managers, 1851), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/IS9R2SUW view on Zotero.]</ref>
* [[Downing, A. J.]], May 1847, describing Wodenethe, residence of Henry Winthrop Sargent, Dutchess County, N.Y. (''Horticulturist'' 1: 504)
:“Our FRONTISPIECE gives a glimpse of this ''Vinery'', at the termination of the main '''walk''' of the fruit-garden. This '''walk''' is 428 feet long, and is bordered with an [[espalier]] rail, upon which many of the choicest peaches, grapes, plums, etc., are trained—not from necessity or for greater protection, as in gardens farther north, for all those fruits ripen perfectly on common standards here, but to give an illustration of this more perfect kind of culture, and to obtain fruit of a larger size and higher color than standards usually produce.” [Fig. 10]
* [[Lyell, Sir Charles]], 1849, describing Natchez, Miss. (2:153) <ref>Sir Charles Lyell, ''A Second Visit to the United States of North America'', 2 vols. (New York: Harper, 1849), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/DU6NKKZ5 view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“Many of the country-houses in the neighborhood are elegant, and some of the gardens belonging to them laid out in the English, others in the [[French style]]. In the latter are seen [[terrace]]s, with [[statue]]s and cut evergreens, straight '''walks''' with [[border]]s of flowers, terminated by [[view]]s into the wild forest, the charms of both being heightened by contrast. Some of the [[hedge]]s are made of that beautiful North American plant, the Gardenia, miscalled in England the Cape jessamine, others of the Cherokee rose, with its bright and shining leaves.”
* Dufield, Elizabeth Lewis, 14 May 1851, describing [[Hermitage]], estate of Andrew Jackson, Nashville, Tenn. (Ladies Hermitage Association Research #977)
:“The house is situated some distance back from the road, as you approach in front, you pass through a fine iron [[gateway]] and '''walk''' strait until about halfway to the house. The '''walk''' then branches off and forms a circular in front of the residence. There are also small circulars on each side. All of these are laid out in flower and cedars and the balance of the [[yard]] in front is filed up with cedars and forest trees.”
* Committee on the Capitol Square, Richmond City Council, 24 July 1851, describing [[John Notman|John Notman’s ]] plans for the [[Capitol Square]], Richmond, Va. (quoted in Greiff 1979: 162) <ref>Constance Greiff, ''John Notman, Architect, 1810-1865'' (Philadelphia: Athenaeum of Philadelphia, 1979),[https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/SXT2RI6Z view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“'''walks''' will be made in every direction and as some compensation for filling up the beautiful vale south of the Monument a capacious fountain will be placed in the centre of the '''walk''' leading into Bank street, from which [[fountain]] a [[jet d’eau]] will rise, fully thirty feet in height.”

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