* [[Penn, William]], 15 October 1685, describing [[Pennsbury Manor]], country estate of William Penn, near Philadelphia, Pa. (quoted in Thomforde 1986: 54) <ref name="Thomforde"></ref>
:“I desire a . . . handsome '''walk''' to ye house of Gravel, or paved wth pitt stones—smooth stones.”
*[[Jones, Hugh]], 1724, describing the [[Governor’s Palace]], Williamsburg, Va. (quoted in Lockwood 1934: 2:48) <ref>Alice B. Lockwood, ''Gardens of Colony and State: Gardens and Gardeners of the American Colonies and of the Republic before 1840'', 2 vols. (New York: Charles Scribner’s for the Garden Club of America, 1931), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/JNB7BI9T view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“stands the Palace or Governor’s House, a magnificent structure built at the publick Expense, finished and beautified with [[Gate]]s, fine Gardens, Offices, '''Walks''', a fine [[Canal]], [[Orchard]]s, and with a great number of the best arms nicely posited by the ingenious Contrivance of the accomplished Colonel Spotswood.”
* [[Byrd, William, II]], 28 September 1732, describing the estate of Gov. Alexander Spotswood, near Ger-mannaGermanna, Va. (1970: 357–58, 360) <ref>William Byrd, ''The Writings of Colonel William Byrd of Westover in Virginia, Esqr.'', ed. by John Spencer Bassett (New York: B. Franklin, 1970), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/3VVVZ9XQ view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“After Breakfast the Colo. and I left the Ladys to their Domestick Affairs, and took a turn in the Garden, which has nothing beautiful but 3 [[Terrace]] '''Walks''' that fall in [[Slope]]s one below another. . . .
* [[Pinckney, Eliza Lucas]], c. May 1743, describing [[Crowfield]], plantation of William Middleton, vicinity of Charleston, S.C. (1972: 61). <ref>Eliza Lucas Pinckney, ''The Letterbook of Eliza Lucas Pinckney, 1739-1762'', ed. by Elise Pinckney (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1972), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/EBQQ2RAU view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“From the back door is a spacious '''walk''' a thousand foot long; each side of which nearest the house is a grass plat ennamiled in a Serpenting manner with flowers.”
* [[Moore, Francis]], 1744, describing the Trustees’ Garden, Savannah, Ga. (quoted in Marye and Marye 1933: 15) <ref>Florence Marye (Nisbet) and Philip Thornton Marye, ''Garden History of Georgia, 1733-1933'', ed. by Hattie C. Rainwater and Loraine M. Cooney (Atlanta, Ga.: Peachtree Garden Club, 1933), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/GNC4U42D view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“The Garden is laid out with Cross-'''walks''' planted with Orange-trees, but the last Winter a good deal of Snow having fallen, had killed those upon the Top of the Hill down to their Roots, but they being cut down, sprouted again, as I saw when I returned to Savannah.”
* [[Stiles, Ezra]], 30 September 1754, describing Springettsbury, near Philadelphia, Pa. (''Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography'' 16: 375)
:“passing a a long spacious '''walk''', set on each side with trees, on the summit of a gradual ascent, we saw the proprietor’s house, & walkt in the gardens, where besides the beautiful '''walk''', ornamented with evergreens, we saw fruit trees . . . [with] oranges, limes, lemons, citrons. . . . Spruce [[hedge]]s cut into beautiful figures, &c., all forming the most agreeable variety, & even regular confusion & disorder.”
* [[Callender, Hannah]], 1762, describing [[Belmont Mansion]], estate of [[Judge William Peters]], near Philadelphia, Pa. (''Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography'' 12: 455)
:“A broad '''walk''' of English Cherry trees leads down to the river. The doors of the house opening opposite admit a [[prospect]] of the length of the garden over a broad gravel walk to a large handsome [[summer house]] on a [[green]].”
*[[Eddis, William]], 1 October 1769, describing the Governor’s House, Annapolis, Md. (1792: 117) <ref>William Eddis, ''Letters from America: Historical and Descriptive; Compromising Occurances from 1769 to 1777 Inclusive'' (London: Printed for the author, 1792), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/ZMDDRPFN view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“The garden is not extensive, but it is disposed to the utmost advantage; the centre '''walk''' is terminated by a small green [[mount]], close to which the Severn approaches; this elevation commands an extensive [[view]] of the bay, and the adjacent country.”
* [[Fithian, Philip Vickers]], 18 March 1774, describing Nomini Hall, Westmoreland County, Va. (1943: 109) <ref>Philip Vickers Fithian, ''Journal & Letters of Philip Vickers Fithian, 1773-1774: A Plantation Tutor of the Old Dominion'', ed. by Hunter D. Farish (Williamsburg, Va.: Colonial Williamsburg, 1943), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/XJX4WV8F/ view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“The Area of the Triangle made by the Wash-House, Stable, & School-House is perfectly levil, & designed for a [[bowling-Green]], laid out in rectangular '''Walks''' which are paved with Brick, & covered over with burnt Oyster-Shells.”
* [[Adams, John]], 23 February 1777, describing Mount Clare, plantation of Charles and Margaret Tilghman Carroll, Baltimore, Md. (quoted in Sarudy 1989: 139) <ref>Barbara Wells Sarudy, ‘Eighteenth-Century Gardens of the Chesapeake’, ''Journal of Garden History'', 9 (1989), 104–59, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/PGSNXHMJ view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“There is a most beautiful '''walk''' from the house down to the water; there is a descent not far from the house; you have a fine garden then you descend a few steps and have another fine garden; you go down a few more and have another.”
* [[Hazard, Ebenezer]], 31 May 1777, describing the [[College of William and Mary]], Williamsburg, Va. (quoted in Shelley 1954: 405) <ref>Fred Shelley, ‘The Journal of Ebenezer Hazard in Virginia, 1777’, ''Virginia Magazine of History and Biography'', 62 (1954), 400–423, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/Q8VUV2A3 view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“At this Front of the College is a large Court Yard, ornamented with Gravel '''Walks''', Trees cut into different Forms, & Grass.”
* [[Washington, George]], 28 February 1785, describing [[Mount Vernon]], plantation of George Washington, Fairfax County, Va. (quoted in Johnson 1953: 99–100) <ref>Gerald W. Johnson, ''Mount Vernon: The Story of a Shrine'' (New York: Random House, 1953), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/F2JS5DHZ view on Zotero.]</ref>
: “My Gardens have gravel '''walks''' (as you possibly may recollect) in the usual Style, but if a better composition has been discovered for these, I should gladly adopt it. the matter however which I wish principally to be informed in, is, whether your '''walks''' are designed for Carriages, and if so, how they are prepared, to resist the impression of the Wheels. I am making a serpentine road to my door, and have doubts . . . whether any thing short of solid pavement will answer.”
* [[Washington, George]], 1785, describing [[Mount Vernon]], plantation of George Washington, Fairfax County, Va. (Jackson and Twohig, eds., 1978: 4:96, 97) <ref>Donald Jackson and Dorothy Twohig, ''The Diaries of George Washington'', 6 vols. (Charlottesville, Va.: University Press of Virginia, 1978), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/9ZIIR3FT/ view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“[28 February] Planted all the Mulberry trees, Maple trees, & Black gums in my Serpentine '''walks''' and the Poplars on the right '''walk'''—the Sap of which and the Mulberry appeared to be moving. Also planted 4 trees from H. Hole the name unknown but of a brittle wood which has the smell of Mulberry. . . .
* [[Cutler, Rev. Manasseh]], 2 July 1787, describing Middletown, Conn. (1987: 215–16) <ref name="Cutler 87">William Parker Cutler, ''Life, Journals, and Correspondence of Rev. Manasseh Cutler, LL. D'' (Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1987), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/3PBNT7H9 view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“At the northern end of the city is a '''walk''' of two rows of buttonwood trees, from the front [[gate]] of a gentleman’s house down to a summer-house on the bank of the river, by far the most beautiful I ever saw. He permits the people of the city to improve it as a [[mall]].”
* [[Cutler, Rev. Manasseh]], 13 July 1787, describing the [[State House Yard]], Philadelphia, Pa. (1987: 1:263). <ref name="Cutler 87"></ref>
:“The numerous '''walks''' are well graveled and rolled hard; they are all in a serpentine direction, which heightens the beauty, and affords constant variety. That painful sameness, commonly to be met with in garden-[[alley]]s, and others works of this kind, is happily avoided here, for there are no two parts of the [[Mall]] that are alike. Hogarth’s ‘Line of Beauty’ is here completely verified. The public are indebted to the fertile fancy and taste of [[Samuel Vaughan|Mr. Sam’l Vaughan, Esq.]], for the elegance of this plan. It was laid out and executed under his direction about three years ago.”
* [[Enys, Lt. John]], 2 December 1787, describing the mall in Boston, Mass. (Cometti, ed., 1976: 202). <ref>Elizabeth Cometti, ''The American Journals of Lt. John Enys'' (Syracuse, N.Y.: Adirondack Museum and Syracuse University Press, 1976), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/3MFFCCFE view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“After Dinner we took a '''walk''' on the [[Mall]] as it is called which is a very excellent: Gravel '''walk''' about half a Mile in Lenth with Trees on each side which is kept in very good order and is by far the best thing of the kind I have yet seen in america.”
* [[Morse, Jedidiah]], 1789, describing the State House Yard, Philadelphia, Pa. (p. 331)
:“The state house [[yard]], is a neat, elegant and spacious public '''walk''', ornamented with rows of trees; but a high brick [[wall]], which encloses it, limits the [[prospect]].”
* [[L’Enfant, Pierre-Charles]], 22 June 1791, describing Washington, D.C. (quoted in Reps 1967: 17) <ref>John W. Reps, Monumental Washington, The Planning and Development of the Capital Center (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1967), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/DQCIQTFZ view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“I placed the three grand Departments of State contigous to the principle Palace and on the way leading to the Congressional House the gardens of the one together with the [[park]] and other improvement on the dependency are connected with the publique '''walk''' and [[avenue]] to the Congress house in a manner as most [must] form a whole as grand as it will be agreeable and convenient to the whole city which form [from] The distribution of the local [locale] will have an early access to this place of general resort and all along side of which may be placed play houses, room of assembly, accademies and all such sort of places as may be attractive to the learned and afford diversion to the idle.”
* [[Trumbull, John]], 1792, describing [[Yale College]], New Haven, Conn. (Yale University Library, Manuscripts and Archives, Yale Picture Collection, 48A-46, box 1, folder 2)
:“The [[Temple]]s of Cloacina (which it is too much the custom of New England to place conspicuously,) I would wish to have concealed as much as possible, by planting a variety of Shrubs, such as Laburnums, Lilacs, Roses, Snowballs, Laurels. &c, &c—a gravel '''walk''' should lead thro [sic] the [[Shrubbery]] to those buildings. . . .
* [[Drayton, John]], 1793, describing the [[Battery Park]], New York, N.Y. (quoted in Deák 1988: 1:130) <ref name="Deák">Gloria Gilda Deák, ''Picturing America, 1497-1899: Prints, Maps, and Drawings Bearing on the New World Discoveries and on the Development of the Territory That Is Now the United States'', 2 vols. (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1988), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/4A6QNFNX view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“After passing these islands [Governor’s, etc.], we came opposite the battery; which is at the extreme point of the town. . . . It has no merlons, or embrasuers; but the guns . . . are placed upon carriages on a stone platform ''en barbette'', some few feet above the level of the water. Between the guns, and the water is a public '''walk'''; made by a gentle decline from the platform: and going round the ground upon which the battery is placed. Some little distance behind the guns, two rows of elm trees are planted; which in a short time will afford an agreeable shade.”
* [[Latrobe, Benjamin Henry]], 19 July 1796, describing [[Mount Vernon]], plantation of George Washington, Fairfax County, Va. (1977: 165) <ref>
Benjamin Henry Latrobe, ''The Virginia Journals of Benjamin Henry Latrobe, 1795-1798'', ed. by Edward C. Carter II, 2 vols. (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1977), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/SZEEBG9K view on Zotero.]</ref>
* Brooks, Joshua, 1799, describing [[Mount Vernon]], plantation of George Washington, Fairfax County, Va. (quoted in Riley 1989: 18) <ref>John P. Riley, ''The Icehouses and Their Operations at Mount Vernon'' (Mount Vernon, Va.: Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association, 1989), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/76PVTIZM view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“At the back of the house is a covered staircase to the kitchen or cellar. Here many male and female negroes were at work digging and carrying away the ground to make a level grass plot with a gravel '''walk''' around it, at one end of which is an ice house.”
* [[Ogden, John Cosens]], 1800, describing Bethlehem, Pa. (pp. 14, 18) <ref>John C. Ogden, ''An Excursion into Bethlehem & Nazareth, in Pennsylvania, in the Year 1799'' (Philadelphia: Charles Cist, 1800), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/U5CTTBGB view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“In the rear of this [girl’s school], is another small enclosure, which forms a broad grass '''walk''' and is skirted on each side by [[bed]]s devoted to flowers, which the girls cultivate, as their own. . . .
* [[Clitherall, Eliza Caroline Burgwin ]] (Caroline Elizabeth Burgwin), active 1801, describing the [[Hermitage]], seat of John Burgwin, Wilmington, N.C. (quoted in Flowers 1983: 126) <ref>John Flowers, ‘People and Plants: North Carolina’s Garden History Revisited’, ''Eighteenth Century Life'', 8 (1983), 117–29, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/FCVW8GHV view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“These [gardens] were extensive and beautifully laid out. There was [''sic''] [[alcove]]s and [[summer house]]s at the termination of each '''walk''', [[seat]]s under trees in the more shady recesses of the Big Garden, as it was called, in distinction from the [[flower garden]] in front of the house.”
* [[Pintard, John]], 1801, describing New Orleans, La. (Sterling, ed., 1951: 231) <ref>David Lee Sterling, ‘New Orleans, 1801: An Account by John Pintard’, ''Louisiana Historical Quarterly'', 34 (1951), 217–33, [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/8A58JVVT view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“The only public '''walk''' is the leveé, which is externally thronged with all sorts & conditions of people. It is far from an eligible [[promenade]] for the ladies—who are obliged to frequent it for exercise—It is about 8 feet wide, the [[slope]] towards the river presents all the shipping of the harbour with their usual concomitants of noisey [''sic''] drunken labourers & sailors.”
* [[Jefferson, Thomas]], July 1806, describing [[Monticello]], plantation of Thomas Jefferson, Charlottesville, Va. (1944: 323) <ref>
Thomas Jefferson, ''The Garden Book'', ed. by Edwin M. Betts (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1944), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/8ZA5VRP5 view on Zotero.]</ref>
* [[Drayton, Charles]], 2 November 1806, describing the [[Woodlands]], seat of [[William Hamilton]], near Philadelphia, Pa. (Drayton Hall, Charles Drayton Diaries, 1784–1820, typescript)
:“The ''Garden'' consists of a large verdant [[lawn]] surrounded by a belt or '''walk''', & [[shrubbery]] for some distance. the outer side of the '''walk''' is adorned here & there, by scattered forest trees, thick & thin. It is bounded, partly as is described—partly by the Schylkill [''sic''] & a creek exhibiting a Mill & where it is scarcely noticed, by a common post and rail. The '''walk''' is said to be a mile long—perhaps it is something less. one is led in to the garden from the [[portico]], to the east and left hand. or from the [[park]], by a small [[gate]] contiguous to the house. traversing this '''walk''', one sees many beauties of landscape.”
* Anonymous, 2 January 1808, describing in the ''Washington Expositor'' the [[national Mall]], Washington, D.C. (quoted in O’Malley 1989: 99–100) <ref name ="O'Malley 1989">Therese O’Malley, ‘Art and Science in American Landscape Architecture: The National Mall, Washington, D.C. 1791-1852’ (unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, University of Pennsylvania, 1989), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/TQVME883 view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“At present these large appropriations afford an increase to the pasturage of the city, more beneficial to the poor citizens, than their culture in the ordinary courses. . . . by laying off those in their occupancy so as to afford ample '''walks''' open at seasonable hours and under proper regulations to the public, it will give to the city, much earlier than there is otherwise reasonable cause to hope for, agreeable [[promenade]]s, as conducive to the health of the inhabitants, as to the beauty of the places.”

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