* Buist, Robert, 1841, ''The American Flower Garden Directory'' (pp. 11, 32) <ref>Robert Buist, ''The American Flower Garden Directory'', 2nd edn (Philadelphia: Carey and Hart, 1841), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/TI7IE55B/ view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“For perspicuity, admit that the area to be enclosed [for a [[flower garden]]] should be from one to three acres, a circumambient '''walk''' should be traced at some distance within the [[fence]], by which the whole is enclosed; the inferior '''walks''' should partly circumscribe and intersect the general surface in an easy serpentine and sweeping manner, and at such distances as would allow an agreeable [[view]] of the flowers when walking for exercise. '''Walks''' may be in breadth from three to twenty feet, although from four to ten feet is generally adopted . . . covered with gravel, and then firmly rolled with a heavy roller. . . .
* Loudon, Jane, 1845, ''Gardening for Ladies'' (pp. 406–9) <ref>Jane Loudon, ''Gardening for Ladies; and Companion to the Flower-Garden'', ed. by A. J. Downing (New York: Wiley & Putnam, 1845), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/3Q5GCH4I view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“'''WALKS''' may be considered with reference to their direction, their construction, and their management. In a small garden, the direction of the main '''walks''' should generally be governed by the boundary lines; and hence, in a [[plot]] of ground which is [[square]] or oblong, the '''walks''' should be straight and rectangular; the object in such a case being to produce the beauties of regularity and symmetry. On the other hand, when the boundaries of the garden are irregular, the surrounding '''walk''' may be irregular also; the object in this irregularity being to create variety by contrast in the direction. When a garden bounded by straight lines, is so large as to contain an acre or two, and the whole of the interior is to be laid out as a pleasure-ground, then the '''walks''' may be varied in direction; the boundary being concealed by trees and shrubs, or by artificial undulations of the soil. In general, it may be laid down as a principle, that all '''walks''' should be straight when there is no obvious reason why they should be otherwise; and hence, in the case of all winding '''walks''', if there is not a natural and apparently unavoidable reason for their deviating from the straight line, an artificial reason ought to be created. . . . All straight '''walks''' should lead to some conspicuous object at the further end of the '''walk''', and facing it, so as to appear to belong to it; and this object should be seen the moment the '''walk''' is entered upon. . . . A winding '''walk''', on the contrary, requires no object at the further end to allure the spectator; because every turn has the effect of an object by exciting his curiosity and inducing him to advance to see what is beyond.”
* Johnson, George William, 1847, ''A Dictionary of Modern Gardening'' (pp. 26, 73, 269–70, 620) <ref>George William Johnson, ''A Dictionary of Modern Gardening'', ed. by David Landreth (Philadelphia: Lea and Blanchard, 1847), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/D6PQSNAN/ view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“[[ALLEY]]S are of two kinds. 1. The narrow '''walks''' which divide the compartments of the [[kitchen garden]]; and 2. Narrow '''walks''' in shrubberies and pleasure-grounds, closely bounded and overshadowed by the shrubs and trees. . . .
* Downing, A. J., 1849, ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening'' (pp. 114, 342, 530–31) <ref>A. J. [Andrew Jackson] Downing, ''A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening, Adapted to North America'', 4th edn (Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, 1991), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/K7BRCDC5 view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“'''''Walks''''' are laid out for purposes similar to [[Drive]]s, but are much more common, and may be introduced into every scene, however limited. They are intended solely for [[promenade]]s or exercise on foot, and should therefore be dry and firm, if possible, at all seasons when it is desirable to use them. Some may be open to the south, sheltered with evergreens, and made dry and hard for a warm [[promenade]] in winter; others formed of closely mown turf, and thickly shaded by a leafy canopy of verdure, for a cool retreat in the midst of summer. Others again may lead to some sequestered spot, and terminate in a secluded rustic [[seat]], or conduct to some shaded dell or rugged [[eminence]], where an extensive [[prospect]] can be enjoyed. Indeed, the genius of the place must suggest the direction, length, and number of the '''walks''' to be laid out, as no fixed rules can be imposed in a subject so everchanging and different. It should, however, never be forgotten, that the '''walk''' ought always to correspond to the scene it traverses, being rough where the latter is wild and [[picturesque]], sometimes scarcely differing from a common footpath, and more polished as the surrounding objects show evidence of culture and high keeping. . . .
* Breck, Joseph, 1851, ''The Flower-Garden'' (p. 20) <ref>Joseph Breck, ''The Flower-Garden, or Breck’s Book of Flowers'' (Boston: John P. Jewett, 1851), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/HN3UEKMP view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“''Width of '''Walks'''''.—The main '''walk''', or '''walks''', of a [flower] garden, should be laid out on a liberal scale. Nothing detracts so much from the pleasures of the flower-garden as contracted '''walks'''. When we wish to enjoy the company of a friend, in the flower-garden, it is much more agreeable to have him by our side, arm in arm, than to be under the necessity of making the tour of the garden in Indian file. The main '''walks''' should, therefore, be calculated so as to admit two persons to '''walk''' comfortably in a social manner; and, if wide enough for a little one in addition, so much the better. From five to six feet will not be too wide for the main [[avenue]]. The internal compartments, of course, should have much narrower '''walks''', the width of which must be graduated in a degree by the size of the garden.
* New York State Lunatic Asylum Trustees, 1851, describing the ideal grounds for a lunatic asylum (quoted in Hawkins 1991: 53) <ref>Kenneth Hawkins, ‘The Therapeutic Landscape: Nature, Architecture, and Mind in Nineteenth-Century America’ (unpublished Ph.D. diss., University of Rochester, 1991), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/UVDGPDHG view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“The salutary influence on the insane mind of highly cultivated lawns—pleasant '''walks''' amid shade trees, [[shrubbery]], and [[fountains]], beguiling the long hours of their [sic] tedious confinement—giving pleasure, content, and health, by their beauty and variety, are fully appreciated by us.”
* Ranlett, William H., 1851, ''The Architect'' ([1851] 1976: 2:47) <ref>William H. Ranlett, ''The Architect'', 2 vols. (New York: Da Capo, 1976), [https://www.zotero.org/groups/54737/items/itemKey/QGQPCB5J view on Zotero.]</ref>
:“The little cottage . . . was built last year for Augustus W. Clason, Esq. of Westchester. . . . The grounds contain fifteen acres, of which five are wooded with a very old growth, and the rest lie in grass. It is intended to throw '''walks''' through the [[lawn]] and adorn their [[borders]], but not to set apart any one spot for a garden.”

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