* Anonymous, 2 February 1734, describing property for sale in Charleston, S.C. (''South Carolina Gazette'')
:“To Be Let or Sold. . . . On the island is a New Dwelling House &c. built on a high Bluff, which commands an entire [[prospect]] of the Harbour, from the Barr to the Town. A delightful [[Wilderness]] with shady '''Walks''' and Arbours, cool in the hottest Seasons. A piece of Garden-ground, where all the best kinds of Fruits and Kitchen Greens are produced, and planted with Orange-, Apple-, Peach-, Nectarine-, and Plumb-trees, capable of being made a very good Vineyard.”
* Stiles, Ezra, 30 September 1754, describing Springettsbury, near Philadelphia, Pa. (''Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography '' 16: 375)
:“passing a a long spacious '''walk''', set on each side with trees, on the summit of a gradual ascent, we saw the proprietor’s house, & walkt in the gardens, where besides the beautiful '''walk''', ornamented with evergreens, we saw fruit trees . . . [with] oranges, limes, lemons, citrons. . . . Spruce [[hedge]]s cut into beautiful figures, &c., all forming the most agreeable variety, & even regular confusion & disorder.”
* Callender, Hannah, 1762, describing Belmont Mansion, estate of Judge William Peters, near Philadelphia, Pa. (''Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography '' 12: 455)
:“A broad '''walk''' of English Cherry trees leads down to the river. The doors of the house opening opposite admit a [[prospect]] of the length of the garden over a broad gravel walk to a large handsome [[summer house]] on a [[green]].”
* Constantia [pseud.], 24 June 1790, describing Gray’s Garden, Philadelphia, Pa. (''Massachusetts Magazine '' 3: 414)
:“The serpentine gravel '''walks''', which are irregularly regular, seem to point different ways; they however terminate in one object.”
* Drayton, John, 1793, describing the Battery Park, New York, N.Y. (quoted in Deák 1988: 1:130)
:“After passing these islands [Governor’s, etc.], we came opposite the battery; which is at the extreme point of the town. . . . It has no merlons, or embrasuers; but the guns . . . are placed upon carriages on a stone platform ''en barbette'', some few feet above the level of the water. Between the guns, and the water is a public '''walk'''; made by a gentle decline from the platform: and going round the ground upon which the battery is placed. Some little distance behind the guns, two rows of elm trees are planted; which in a short time will afford an agreeable shade.”
* Clitherall, Eliza Caroline Burgwin (Caroline Elizabeth Burgwin), active 1801, describing the Hermitage, seat of John Burgwin, Wilmington, N.C. (quoted in Flowers 1983: 126)
:“These [gardens] were extensive and beautifully laid out. There was [''sic''] [[alcove]]s and [[summer house]]s at the termination of each '''walk''', [[seat]]s under trees in the more shady recesses of the Big Garden, as it was called, in distinction from the [[flower garden]] in front of the house.”
* Pintard, John, 1801, describing New Orleans, La. (Sterling, ed., 1951: 231)
:“The only public '''walk''' is the leveé, which is externally thronged with all sorts & conditions of people. It is far from an eligible [[promenade]] for the ladies—who are obliged to frequent it for exercise—It is about 8 feet wide, the [[slope]] towards the river presents all the shipping of the harbour with their usual concomitants of noisey [''sic''] drunken labourers & sailors.”
* Anonymous, 1801, describing in the ''Supplement to the Warner & Hanna Directory '' Chatsworth’s Gardens, Baltimore, Md. (Colonial Williamsburg Foundation)
: “CHATSWORTH’S GARDENS, Situated in a westerly direction, about half a mile from town, at the intersection of Green and Saratoga streets. The present proprietor, Mr. Mang, has been but a short time there—the arrangement of these Gardens are said to be extremely neat, such as forming pleasant [[summer house]], serpentine '''walks''', shady [[grove]]s, and every other rural appearance, which may give a pleasing relaxation to the leisure hours of the industrious citizen.”
* Drayton, Charles, 2 November 1806, describing the Woodlands, seat of William Hamilton, near Philadelphia, Pa. (Drayton Hall, Charles Drayton Diaries, 1784–1820, typescript)
:“The ''Garden '' consists of a large verdant [[lawn]] surrounded by a belt or '''walk''', & [[shrubbery]] for some distance. the outer side of the '''walk''' is adorned here & there, by scattered forest trees, thick & thin. It is bounded, partly as is described—partly by the Schylkill [''sic''] & a creek exhibiting a Mill & where it is scarcely noticed, by a common post and rail. The '''walk''' is said to be a mile long—perhaps it is something less. one is led in to the garden from the [[portico]], to the east and left hand. or from the [[park]], by a small [[gate]] contiguous to the house. traversing this '''walk''', one sees many beauties of landscape.”
* Anonymous, 2 January 1808, describing in the ''Washington Expositor '' the national Mall, Washington, D.C. (quoted in O’Malley 1989: 99–100)
:“At present these large appropriations afford an increase to the pasturage of the city, more beneficial to the poor citizens, than their culture in the ordinary courses. . . . by laying off those in their occupancy so as to afford ample '''walks''' open at seasonable hours and under proper regulations to the public, it will give to the city, much earlier than there is otherwise reasonable cause to hope for, agreeable [[promenade]]s, as conducive to the health of the inhabitants, as to the beauty of the places.”
* Lambert, John, 1816, describing Savannah, Ga. (2:265–66)
:“This range of buildings extends nearly three quarters of a mile along the town; and opposite to it is a beautiful '''walk''' or [[mall]], planted with a double row of trees, the same as those at Charleston— (''Melia Azedarach'', or Pride of India). . . .
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:“About the centre of the '''walk''', and just on the verge of the cliff, stands the Exchange, a large brick building, which contains some public offices; and an assembly-room, where a concert and ball are held once a fortnight during the winter.”
* Latrobe, Benjamin Henry, 20 February 1819, describing the Montgomery House, New Orleans, La. (1951: 43–45)
:“Close to the river, & separated only by the levee & road, is the old fashioned, but otherwise handsome, garden & house of Mr. Montgomery. The garden, which I think covers not less than 4 acres, is laid out in [[square]] '''walks''' & flower [[bed]]s in the old [[French style]]. It is entirely enclosed by a thick [[hedge]] of orange trees, which have been suffered to run up to 15 or 16 feet high on the flanks & rear, but which are shorn down to the highth [''sic''] of 4 or 5 feet along the road. The '''Walks''' are bordered by very large myrtles cut into the shape of large hay cocks, about 8 feet high & as much in diameter. There are so many of them, and they are so exactly equal in size & form that the effect is curious if not elegant.”
* Thacher, James, 3 December 1830, describing Hyde Park, seat of Dr. David Hosack, on the Hudson River, N.Y. (''New England Farmer '' 9: 156)
:“From the house, gravelled '''walks''' diverge and extend in opposite directions nearly half a mile, exhibiting a diversified scenery of hills and dales, now descending a sloping declivity on the verge of a precipice, again ascending to a commanding plain, opening a scene of unrivalled beauty.”
* Anonymous, 6 December 1835, “Leaves from My Note Book” (''Horticultural Register '' 2: 32–33)
:“There is one thing about the improvements in New York I very much like, and which, as you are a man of influence, I hope you will endeavor to impress on the Bostonians;—the disposition to ornament the streets with rows of trees, thus giving to them an air of freshness and beauty very much wanting in our large cities and in country towns, for nothing adds more to beauty than rows of trees along the public '''walks''', which may be placed there for a trifling expense.
* Alcott, William A., 1838, “Embellishment and Improvement of Towns and Villages” (''American Annals of Education '' 8: 337–38)
:“Of our larger cities, even Philadelphia and Boston, we do not hesitate to say that almost every thing, in their structure and condition, is at war with the highest physical and moral well being of their inhabitants. We do not indeed forget their beautiful [[common]]s and [[square]]s and public '''walks'''; but it is impossible for us to believe that a few of these will ever atone for that neglect whose effects stare us in the face, not merely in passing through dirty and filthy [[avenue]]s, but in traversing almost every street, and in turning almost every corner. A single [[common]], beautiful though it may be, as any spot on the earth’s surface, and refreshed though it were by the balmy breezes which ‘blow soft o’er Ceylon’s isle;’ or a few public [[square]]s, remembrances though they be of him whose praises will never cease to be celebrated while the ‘city of brotherly love’ shall remain, will yet never purify the crowded, unventilated cellars and shops—and dwellings, too—of a hundred or a thousand thickly congregated streets. . . .”
* Hovey, C. M., November 1839, “Notices of Gardens and Horticulture, in Salem, Mass,” describing Elfin Glen, residence of P. Dodge, Salem, Mass. (''Magazine of Horticulture '' 5: 404)
:“The cottage stands near the road, and is entered from the west front; on the south end is a [[piazza]]; the drawing-room opens into this, and thence into the garden to an open space, answering somewhat the purpose of a [[terrace]], neatly gravelled; a '''walk''' from thence conducts directly, in a straight line, nearly to the edge of the river, where it terminates in a rustic [[arch]] and [[vase]] on the [[lawn]]; on each side of the '''walk''' there is turf, with circles of flowers at the distance of ten or twelve feet; these are each backed by a line of buckthorn [[hedge]]s, with a [[view]] to screen both the fruit garden on the east, and the vegetable garden on the west, from sight.”
* Hovey, C. M., September 1841, describing the residence of R. F. Carman, Fort Washington, N.Y. (''Magazine of Horticulture '' 7: 326)
:“The [[flower garden]] is laid out in angular shaped [[bed]]s of small size, occupying a [[square]] of about one hundred feet, with the '''walks''' edged with box. The only fault we have to find with the plan is the narrowness of the '''walks''', not being above two feet wide, and, consequently, not allowing two to '''walk''' abreast. The same error we saw committed at other places. It should be laid down as a rule, never to make the '''walks''' less than three feet wide, and if three and a half, it will be better.”
* Downing, A. J., May 1847, describing Wodenethe, residence of Henry Winthrop Sargent, Dutchess County, N.Y. (''Horticulturist '' 1: 504)
:“Our FRONTISPIECE gives a glimpse of this ''Vinery'', at the termination of the main '''walk''' of the fruit-garden. This '''walk''' is 428 feet long, and is bordered with an [[espalier]] rail, upon which many of the choicest peaches, grapes, plums, etc., are trained—not from necessity or for greater protection, as in gardens farther north, for all those fruits ripen perfectly on common standards here, but to give an illustration of this more perfect kind of culture, and to obtain fruit of a larger size and higher color than standards usually produce.” [Fig. 10]
*Londoniensis [pseud.], October 1850, “Notes and Recollections of a Visit to the Nurseries of Messrs. Hovey & Co., Cambridge” (''Magazine of Horticulture '' 16: 445)
:“In the first place, the [[nursery]] is laid out in angular divisions, diverging from a common centre. These divisions are separated from each other by wide '''walks''' and [[avenue]]s, on each side of which is a [[border]] some eight or nine feet wide. These [[border]]s are planted with specimen trees, inside of which are the [[quarter]]s for the [[nursery]] stock.”

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